Anthony Merino

Anthony Merino’s first review was published in the January, 1993 issue of New Art Examiner. He currently frequently contributes to Arts & Opinion, HIV+ Magazine, Ceramics Art and Perception and Ceramics Monthly. In August, the exhibition he curated Domestic Mysteries will open at New Taipei City Yingge Ceramics Museum, Taipei, Taiwan. Museum Home Page He can be followed on Twitter @tdubisMerino. More Reviews at...

Features // 1 Articles
Columns // 3 Articles
Reviews // 55 Articles
Blogs // 17 Articles
//Features

The Comedy Gift That Keeps on Giving: Late Night Hosts Respond to the Trump Tapes | 18 Oct 2016 // 10:00 PM

The comedy gods bestowed on late night television the Trump tapes; all stepped up and answered the challenge.

//Columns

The Guggenheim's Latin American Survey Reveals Something New Under the Sun | 11 Sep 2014 // 9:30 PM

Categorizing the world we live in may be one of the most primal of human appetites.This exhibit challenges how we do that.

Ai Weiwei on Truth, Beauty and Futility | 10 Jun 2014 // 10:00 PM

According to What?, a retrospective of Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei currently on display at the Brooklyn Museum of Art.

//Reviews

Red Gets Poisoned, but 'The Blacklist' Gets Better in "The Apothecary" | 26 Feb 2017 // 5:30 AM

Decent writing, great casting, and a potential plot twist help The Blacklist recover some of its faded glory.

'Oklahoma City' Shows That Timothy McVeigh's Terrorism Has Contemporary Reach | 9 Feb 2017 // 4:30 AM

Oklahoma City documents the complex events and individuals that lead to America's largest domestic terrorist attack.

//Blogs

'Who' Will Be the Next Doctor? | 17 Feb 2017 // 5:00 AM

What shall it be? A Doctor with whip-smart delivery of his lines? A woman who will bewitch before she kicks a Dalek's ass? Oh, the possibilities...

Was O.J. Simpson Donald Trump’s Predecessor? | 21 Dec 2016 // 5:30 AM

O.J. Simpson and Donald Trump: more than a few celebrity similarities.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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