Farisa Khalid
Image: Farisa Khalid

Farisa Khalid is an art historian with a background in global health. @FarisaKhalid

Features // 2 Articles
Columns // 4 Articles
Reviews // 18 Articles
Blogs // 29 Articles
//Features

Farewell, Maestro: Rituparno Ghosh (1963-2013) | 3 Jun 2013 // 6:14 PM

Upon the untimely death of the Indian film director Rituparno Ghosh, PopMatters remembers his remarkable career as a director, screenwriter and activist.

Tea and Scones Suspense: Hitchcock's "English" Movies of the Early 1940s | 14 Jun 2010 // 5:00 PM

Although Hitchcock left Great Britain for the United States in 1939, his first two films -- Rebecca (1940) and Suspicion (1941) -- nonetheless remained set firmly in English. His depiction of English life helped craft perceptions of English life for decades to come.

//Columns

Fiction Had Appeal and Poetry Captured Me, but Non-Fiction Proved Irresistible in 2013 | 14 Jan 2014 // 9:15 PM

Art, politics, poetry, food, and global fiction: 2013 year brought in a variety of engaging titles from many genres. Still, non-fiction tops my 2013 favorites.

Guston's Ghosts: 'Out of Time: Philip Guston and the Refiguration of American Postwar Art' | 14 Oct 2013 // 9:20 PM

Robert Slifkin's book on Philip Guston is an incantatory debut work that shows us a compelling new side of the artist's famous Marlborough paintings.

//Reviews

Now, Voyager: Barry Hill's 'Peacemongers' | 20 Apr 2015 // 2:00 AM

'Peacemongers', by the Australian poet and journalist Barry Hill, is an epic travelogue and probing meditation on the importance and elusiveness of peace.

The Butterfly and the Scorpion: 'Whistler: A Life for Art's Sake' | 24 Apr 2014 // 2:30 AM

This biography of James Whistler is full of sharp notes of detail and anecdotes that help one glean various shades of his inscrutable personality

//Blogs

Now, Voyager: 'Kon-Tiki' and the Old World Adventure Saga | 11 Sep 2013 // 6:00 AM

Kon-Tiki, a joint Norwegian and Hollywood venture, is the filmic version of the Millais painting. It’s romantic and hokey and about as subtle as a Norman Rockwell or a movie like Kick-Ass, but it’s a beautiful movie nonetheless.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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