Justin Cober-Lake

Justin Cober-Lake lives in Charlottesville, Virginia, with his wife, kids, and dog. His writing has appeared in a number of places, including Stylus, Paste, Chord, and Trouser Press. His work made its first appearance on CD with the release of Todd Goodman's first symphony, Fields of Crimson. He's recently co-founded the literary fly-fishing journal Rise Forms.

Features // 19 Articles
Columns // 9 Articles
Reviews // 303 Articles
Blogs // 1 Articles

Now Hear This!: mewithoutYou [Philadelphia, PA] | 18 May 2010 // 4:00 PM

It's unlikely that a post-hardcore band that transformed into an indie-pop act while filling out its complex religious and philosophical traditions would have made the best album of 2009.

Three Days, Forty Years, Six Discs | 16 Aug 2009 // 3:59 PM

It's the enticing performances of the smaller acts -- and not the explosions of the big ones -- that made Woodstock such a singular event.


'Spirits Rejoice!' Takes a New Look Into an Old Tradition | 25 Aug 2015 // 1:00 AM

Scholar Jason C. Bivins thinks through more difficult aspects of the relationships between jazz and American religions, while at the same time examining the permeability of both.

Little Punk Babies | 24 May 2007 // 5:00 PM

As Evelyn McDonnell's new book illustrates, motherhood should be neither something done on the side, nor something that pushes everything else away, and it's that balance that our culture and government can be striving for.


Eszter Balint: Airless Midnight | 10 Nov 2015 // 8:30 AM

Balint stirs the fire from all sides, creating fully imagined shadows.

The Velvet Teen: All Is Illusory | 9 Jul 2015 // 6:20 AM

It's good to have them back, if only for the promise of the next album.


Azure Blue Harkens Back to the '80s with "Seasons" | 7 Feb 2012 // 2:15 AM

Performing as Azure Blue, Tobias Isaksson looks back to the 1980s for much of his sound on his new release Rule of Thirds.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

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