Diane Leach

Diane Leach has a Master's Degree in English Literature from Humboldt State University. She writes for PopMatters.com and blogs at Theinsufficientkitchen.com. She can be reached at [email protected]

Features // 5 Articles
Columns // 4 Articles
Reviews // 235 Articles
Blogs // 64 Articles
//Features

Ayn Rand and the World She Made | 8 Nov 2009 // 2:59 PM

Ayn Rand set out to remake reality as if it were an ill-fitting dress: by sheer will, she tried to fashion a Balenciaga gown from a housedress.

Moonwalking | 7 Jul 2009 // 4:00 PM

My God, could that man dance. Michael Jackson moved like the love child of Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse.

//Columns

2013 Was a Fine Year to Have Your Head In a Book | 12 Jan 2014 // 8:05 PM

Five books published in 2013 that stayed with me, that I found myself urging on others, that I now say to you, Hey! Read this!

Riding Into a Nightmare: 'A Train in Winter' | 22 Jan 2012 // 3:00 PM

Caroline Moorehead's A Train In Winter, like Daniel Mendelsohn's The Lost, leaves nothing to the imagination, a decision that makes reading it simultaneously engrossing and deeply disturbing.

//Reviews

Is There Anything Left to Say About Julia Child? A Great Deal, in Fact | 8 Jan 2017 // 8:15 PM

With The French Chef In America, readers get a fresh look at a beloved personality.

Colman Andrews Defines Paul McCartney's Butter Pie for the Non-Brit -- and Other Recipes | 19 Dec 2016 // 2:30 AM

Veteran food writer and lifelong Anglophile Colman Andrews brings his expertise to a book that by rights should be perfect.

//Blogs

Home Culinary Exploration Has Never Been More Fervent | 18 Jan 2017 // 8:15 PM

Ever wondered what the difference between cinnamon and cassia is? The Encyclopedia of Spices and Herbs will teach you.

Misled by 'The Chef's Library' | 11 Oct 2016 // 8:05 PM

What cookbooks do the great chefs use? Great question. Too bad that was only in chapter one.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

That Ribbon of Highway: Sharon Jones Re-shapes Woody Guthrie's Song

// Sound Affects

"Sharon Jones and Woodie Guthrie knew: great songs belong to everybody.

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