Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Guy Crucianelli

Features

Wednesday, December 4 2013

The Magnificently Mutilated Ambersons

Though Citizen Kane has cemented his place in film history, The Magnificent Ambersons -- especially had its original ending been kept -- would prove Orson Welles one of Hollywood’s greatest masters of tragedy, if not the greatest.


Columns

Thursday, October 24 2013

20 Thrillers with a Side of Capers

Each film in The Best of Warner Brothers 20 Film Collection: Thrillers asks, in some or form or another, Where does your loyalty lie, with the guys or your girl?


Monday, January 14 2013

More Than Any Other New American Director, Francis Ford Coppola Reminds Me of Orson Welles

Lifted from over a 40-year period, the Francis Ford Coppola: 5-Film Collection showcases the director's flexibility under circumstances dire and ideal. It also confirms his auteurist consistency.


Tuesday, June 19 2012

An Early Moan from the Great Moaner: Jack Kerouac's 'The Sea Is My Brother'

Jack Kerouac’s greatest achievement is the creation of the most compassionate of 20th century literatures; not just the adolescent fraternalisms or calls for equality, but the glee of rushing down the mountain with the good news, or as the good news, curious about humanity, forgiving, ready to report well and true.


Tuesday, September 20 2011

Buster Keaton the Inventor and Charlie Chaplin the Conjurer

The films of Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin share a fraternal vitality and invention.


Sunday, August 7 2011

Steve Earle's 'I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive'

A been-there-lived-it-attitude and street-level redemption, all propelled by a songwriter's/storyteller's lyrical and narrative knack.


Reviews

Tuesday, July 1 2014

Howard Hawks and John Wayne Defined a Genre with 'Red River'

It’s nearly impossible to not get roped in by the easy banter of the dialogue, the epic drama, and the luminous images of this quintessential Western.


Thursday, May 1 2014

War Is Failure, Art Is Victory!

In Art and the Second World War, Monica Bohm-Duchen honors the unsung infantry of artists.


Wednesday, March 26 2014

The Chilling Effect of Noh Theater on Akira Kurosawa's 'Throne of Blood'

Throne of Blood plays with Noh's frightening incongruity, its delicacy of movement expressing mortifyingly indelicate actions, as when Washizu and Asaji deflate like punctured blow-up dolls as they resolve themselves to treason.


Thursday, December 19 2013

Hate for Orson Welles, Italian Style

Orson Welles In Italy is a key corrective resource for an under-examined portion of Welles' career. If America was resentful of his talent, Italy was downright mean.


Tuesday, December 3 2013

John Cassavetes at His Most Intense, Searching and Experimental

Cassavetes' aesthetic, both in front of and behind the camera, was less Method immersion than mad (as in gleeful) exploration, skirting the emotional edge without tripping into or wallowing in cathartic excess.


Blogs

Thursday, January 9 2014

Lou Reed Owned the '70s

Perhaps because it represented his formation as a solo artist, his manifestation of “Lou Reed”, as opposed to “Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground”, Reed owned the '70s more than any other decade.


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