Scott Interrante
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Scott Interrante currently pursuing a master's degree in musicology at CUNY Hunter College where he focuses on issues of gender and genre in contemporary pop music. He is the host of the Pop Unmuted podcast.

Features // 4 Articles
Reviews // 4 Articles
Blogs // 49 Articles

A Song Can Be About Anything: An Interview with Dan Wilson | 27 Jan 2015 // 8:20 PM

In 2014, former Semisonic frontman and "Someone Like You" scribe Dan Wilson released a solo album, re-released his pre-Semisonic band Trip Shakespeare's albums, and challenged his fans about the fact that a song, in fact, can be about anything.

The Best K-pop of 2014 | 22 Dec 2014 // 8:10 PM

Due to current events, 2014 was largely a rough year for K-pop. Still, these 15 songs represent the best K-pop had to offer this year, both inside and outside the mainstream.


Toy Soldiers: The Maybe Boys | 2 Dec 2013 // 4:30 AM

The Americana rockabilly sensibility of Toy Soldiers' The Maybe Boys instantly transports you to an old barn that has been converted to a dance bar where you've already had a few too many drinks. Recorded "mostly live," the album feels more like a party you're enjoying than a collection of songs you're listening to, which is certainly not a bad thing.

The 1975: The 1975 | 14 Oct 2013 // 8:02 PM

With emo melodies dressed up in disco guitar grooves and '80s rock reverb, the 1975's self-titled album makes for one of the year's most compelling, if flawed, debuts of the year.


K-pop Round Up: July 2015 | 27 Aug 2015 // 3:30 AM

Summer continues in K-pop with July releases from major artists embracing the heat, fun, and wistful nostalgia that comes along with the season.

Pop Unmuted Podcast: Lyrics and Kacey Musgraves' 'Pageant Material' | 4 Aug 2015 // 4:04 AM

The latest installment of Pop Unmuted digs deep into pop lyrics and analyze's Kacey Musgraves' Pageant Material.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

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