Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

By the Book
Excerpts from PopMatters-recommended books.

Friday, August 22 2014

Southbound: An Illustrated History of Southern Rock

Southbound profiles the musicians, producers, record labels, and movers and shakers that defined Southern rock, including the Allmans, Skynyrd, the Marshall Tucker Band and here, the Charlie Daniels Band.


Friday, August 15 2014

Producing Country: The Inside Story of the Great Recordings

The story of country music told through hit records by Hank Williams, George Jones, Patsy Cline, Buck Owens, Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash, Loretta Lynn, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, and many others.


Friday, August 8 2014

The Youngs: The Brothers Who Built AC/DC: Back in Black

It's one of the biggest selling albums of all time and, according to former Guns N' Roses drummer Matt Sorum, "the greatest resurrection of a band in history". But how much of Back in Black was the work of the late Bon Scott?


Friday, August 1 2014

The Youngs: The Brothers Who Built AC/DC: Riff Raff

Powerage is regarded by aficionados, including Keith Richards and Gene Simmons, as the band's finest album. But its commercial failure had major repercussions behind the scenes.


Friday, July 18 2014

The Hippest Trip in America: Soul Train and the Evolution of Culture and Style

Soul Train boldly went where no show had gone before, showcasing young African Americans and the fashions and music that defined their lives: R&B, funk, jazz, disco, and gospel.


Friday, July 11 2014

Twee: The Gentle Revolution in Music, Books, Television, Fashion, and Film

Artisanal chocolate. Mustaches. Locally sourced vegetables. Etsy. Birds. Flea markets. Cult films. Horn-rimmed glasses. Twee.


Friday, May 23 2014

The Streets of San Francisco: Policing and the Creation of a Cosmopolitan Liberal Politics, 1950-72

When the police began using their discretion with African American gang leaders, gay and lesbian bar owners, Haight-Ashbury hippies and other postwar San Franciscans, a rise in liberal cosmopolitism would follow throughout America.


Friday, May 16 2014

Mad World: An Oral History of New Wave Artists and Songs That Defined the 1980s

Mad World celebrates the New Wave music phenomenon of the ‘80s via new interviews with 35 of the most notable artists of the period including Duran Duran, New Order, the Smiths and here, OMD.


Friday, May 9 2014

Expulsions: Brutality and Complexity in the Global Economy

There's the world as most understand it and the world as it's actually evolving, towards an extreme form of capitalism occuring across international borders—to devastating effects.


Friday, May 2 2014

A Broken Hallelujah: Rock and Roll, Redemption, and the Life of Leonard Cohen

This is a portrait of an artist attuned to notions of justice, lust, longing, loneliness, and redemption, and possessing the sort of voice and vision commonly reserved for the prophets.


Friday, April 11 2014

Pedestrianism: When Watching People Walk Was America’s Favorite Spectator Sport

In the late 1800s, America’s most popular spectator sport wasn’t baseball, boxing, or horseracing—it was competitive walking. Indeed, when a New York arena overbooked, fans rioted.


Friday, April 4 2014

Pranksters: Making Mischief in the Modern World

From Benjamin Franklin's hoax about the the death of his rival to Abbie Hoffman’s attempt to levitate the Pentagon to Stephen Colbert’s “news reporting”, pranksters, hoaxers, and con artists use humor to underscore larger, pointed truths about society.


Friday, March 21 2014

Inferno: An Anatomy of American Punishment

In the last 20 years, America’s incarceration rates have risen 500 percent. Sentences are harsh, prisons are overcrowded, life inside is dangerous, and rehabilitation programs don't work. Do we want our prisons to be this way?


Friday, March 14 2014

Sex Scene: Media and the Sexual Revolution

Sex Scene suggests that what we have come to understand as the sexual revolution of the late '60s and early '70s was actually a media revolution.


Friday, March 7 2014

The Scarlet Sisters: Sex, Suffrage, and Scandal in the Gilded Age

Victoria Woodhull and Tennessee "Tennie" Claflin -- the most fascinating and scandalous sisters in American history -- were unequaled for their vastly avant-garde crusade for women's fiscal, political, and sexual independence.


Friday, February 21 2014

Down to the Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Meredith March Against Fear

Martin Luther King, Jr., narrowly escaped a mob attack; protesters were teargassed by state police; Lyndon Johnson refused to intervene; and Stokely Carmichael led the chant that would define a new kind of civil rights movement: Black Power.


Friday, February 14 2014

Lifted: A Cultural History of the Elevator

Before skyscrapers forever transformed urban landscapes, the conveyance that made them possible had to be created.


Friday, January 24 2014

Elegy for Theory

While university curriculums are being driven by scientism and market forces, Rodowick argues for the importance of the arts and humanities as transformative, self-renewing cultural legacies.


Friday, December 13 2013

Why Fanfiction Is Taking Over the World

From Star Trek to The X-Files and Buffy the Vampire Slayer to Harry Potter, Twilight, and beyond, Fic sheds light on the widely misunderstood world(s) of fanfiction and how it is reshaping our literary landscape.


Friday, December 6 2013

The Punishment Imperative: The Rise and Failure of Mass Incarceration in America

Eminent criminologists make a compelling case for why America's 40 year embrace of the punitive spirit has been morally bankrupt and endangered public safety.


Friday, November 8 2013

Furious Cool: Richard Pryor and the World That Made Him

Controversial and somewhat enigmatic, Richard Pryor’s performances opened up a new world of possibilities, merging fantasy with angry reality in a way that wasn’t just new—it was heretofore unthinkable.


Tuesday, October 29 2013

Americana: The Kinks, the Riff, the Road: The Story

Ray Davies tries to make sense of his long love-hate relationship with America, the country that both inspired and frustrated him.


Friday, October 25 2013

Novelty: A History of the New

Novelty remains a central problem of contemporary science and literature—an ever-receding target that, in its complexity and evasiveness, continues to inspire and propel the modern.


Friday, October 18 2013

Merle Haggard: The Running Kind

Merle Haggard’s music helped invent the America we live in today. David Cantwell explores the fascinating contradictions that define not only Haggard’s music and public persona, but the very heart of American culture.


Friday, September 20 2013

Sweet Dreams: The World of Patsy Cline

Country music singer Patsy Cline embodied the power and appeal of women in country music, and helped open the lucrative industry to future female solo artists.


Friday, September 13 2013

The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History

In our postmodern, porn-obsessed culture, vaginas appear to be everywhere, literally or symbolically -- yet they are as silenced as they are objectified. The Vagina examines the paradox of female genitalia through literature, film, TV, visual, and performance art.


Friday, September 6 2013

Without Copyrights: Piracy, Publishing, and the Public Domain

This is a book about the periphery, the elusive point at which law and piracy traded places, legitimacy became lawless, and courtesy grew discourteous.


Thursday, August 29 2013

Smoke Signals: A Social History of Marijuana

Award-winning investigative journalist Martin A. Lee takes us on an entertaining and informative ride through the complex landscape of the Great American Pot story.


Thursday, August 22 2013

Assimilate: A Critical History of Industrial Music

More extreme than punk, industrial music revolted against the very ideas of order and reason: it sought to strip away the brainwashing that was identity itself. It aspired to provoke, bewilder, and roar with independence.


Thursday, August 15 2013

Pretty Good for a Girl: Women in Bluegrass

Drawing from extensive interviews, well-known banjoist Murphy Hicks Henry gives voice to women performers and innovators throughout bluegrass's history.


Thursday, August 8 2013

Mingus Speaks

Charles Mingus is among jazz’s greatest composers and perhaps its most talented bass player. During his lifetime he had a lot to say about the place of jazz in music history and American culture and much more. Mingus speaks, we listen.


Thursday, August 1 2013

Contemporary Collecting: Objects, Practices, and the Fate of Things

These essays cover a breadth of interdisciplinary perspectives and subjects -- from PEZ candy dispensers and trading cards to sports memorabilia and music –- and examine collecting practices on both a personal and professional level.


Thursday, July 25 2013

The New Digital Age: Reshaping the Future of People, Nations and Business

Across every geographical and socioeconomic spectrum, the authors reveal the dramatic developments—good and bad—that will transform both our everyday lives and our understanding of self and society, as technology advances and our virtual identities become more and more fundamentally real.


Thursday, July 18 2013

Ready For a Brand New Beat: How “Dancing in the Street” Became the Anthem for a Changing America

Can a song change a nation? Mark Kurlansky’s work chronicles that extraordinary summer of 1964 and showcases the momentous role that a simple song about dancing played in history.


Thursday, July 11 2013

Desert America: A Journey Through Our Most Divided Landscape

Over the past decade, the most iconic of American landscapes has undergone a political and demographic upheaval comparable only to the opening of the frontier.


Monday, July 8 2013

Detroit Rock City: The Uncensored History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in America’s Loudest City

An oral history of Detroit and its music told by the people who were on the stage, in the clubs, the practice rooms, studios, and in the audience, blasting the music out and soaking it up, in every scene from 1967 to today.


Monday, July 1 2013

Sounds of War: Music in the United States During World War II

While Dinah Shore, Duke Ellington, and the Andrew Sisters entertained civilians and G.I.s with swing and boogie-woogie, Fauser shows it was classical music that truly distinguished musical life in the wartime United States.


Thursday, June 27 2013

That’s Not Funny, That’s Sick: National Lampoon & the Comedy Insurgents Who Captured the Mainstream

Ellin Stein’s book goes behind the jokes to witness the fights, the parties, the collaborations—and the competition—among this fraternity of the self-consciously disenchanted.


Thursday, June 20 2013

Hidden in the Mix: The African American Presence in Country Music

Revealing how music mediates both the ideology and the lived experience of race, Hidden in the Mix challenges the status of country music as "the white man’s blues."


Thursday, June 13 2013

Super Boys: The Amazing Adventures of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster

In time for the 75th anniversary of the Man of Steel comes the first comprehensive literary biography of Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel, creators of the DC Comics superhero Superman.


Thursday, June 6 2013

Japanoise: Music at the Edge of Circulation

Is Noise, an underground music made through an amalgam of feedback, distortion, and electronic effects, Japanoise? Is it even music at all?


Thursday, May 30 2013

A Curious Man: The Strange and Brilliant Life of Robert “Believe It or Not!” Ripley

The supreme irony of Robert L. Ripley’s life, which was dedicated to exalting the strange and unusual, is that he may have been the most amazing oddity of all.


Thursday, May 23 2013

The Jet Sex: Airline Stewardesses and the Making of an American Icon

As the apotheosis of feminine charm and American careerism, the stewardess subtly bucked traditional gender roles and paved the way for the women's movement.


Thursday, May 16 2013

Mojo Hand: The Life and Music of Lightnin’ Hopkins

In a career that took him from the cotton fields of East Texas to the concert stage at Carnegie Hall and beyond, Lightnin’ Hopkins became one of America’s greatest bluesmen.


Thursday, May 9 2013

Democracy of Sound: Music Piracy and the Remaking of American Copyright in the Twentieth Century

This insightful and entertaining look at the history of music piracy offers invaluable background to the hot-button issue of creativity and the law.


Thursday, May 2 2013

Should Hollywood Lie Low or Sound the Alarm? ‘Hollywood and Hitler, 1933-1939’

Between 1933 and 1939, representations of the Nazis and the full meaning of Nazism came slowly to Hollywood, growing more distinct and ominous only as the decade wore on.


Thursday, April 25 2013

Pink Globalization: Hello Kitty’s Trek Across the Pacific

Hello Kitty is one aspect of "pink globalization"—the spread of goods and images labeled cute (kawaii) from Japan to other parts of the industrial world.


Thursday, April 18 2013

The People’s Car: A Global History of the Volkswagen Beetle

Bernhard Rieger examines culture and technology, politics and economics, and industrial design and advertising genius to reveal how a car commissioned by Hitler and designed by Ferdinand Porsche became an exceptional global commodity on a par with Coca-Cola.


Thursday, April 11 2013

eGods: Faith Versus Fantasy in Computer Gaming

"If humans are by nature lovers of fantasy, then little may be lost if they consider all their gods to be fantasies."


Thursday, April 4 2013

Sharing the Prize: The Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the American South

Gavin Wright's work makes clear that the material benefits of the civil rights acts of the '60s are as significant as the moral ones—an especially timely achievement as these monumental pieces of legislation, and the efficacy of governmental intervention more broadly, face new challenges.


Monday, April 1 2013

The Stone Roses: War and Peace

Going beyond the myths to depict a band that defined Britpop, Simon Spence illustrates the Stone Roses’ incandescent talent and jaw-dropping success while contextualizing them in the ‘90s music scene.


Thursday, March 28 2013

‘Mad Men’, Mad World: Sex, Politics, Style, and the 1960s

Scholars across the humanities consider Mad Men from a fascinating array of perspectives, including fashion, history, civil rights, feminism, consumerism, and art, as well as through theoretical frames such as critical race theory, gender, queer theory, and psychoanalysis.


Thursday, March 21 2013

New Queer Cinema: The Director’s Cut

As a critic, curator, journalist, and scholar, B. Ruby Rich has been inextricably linked to the New Queer Cinema from its inception. Her book follows this cinematic movement from its origins in the mid-‘80s to the present.


Thursday, March 14 2013

Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think

Which paint color is most likely to tell you that a used car is in good shape? How can officials identify the most dangerous New York City manholes before they explode? How did Google searches predict the spread of the H1N1 flu outbreak?


Thursday, March 7 2013

River of Dark Dreams: Slavery and Empire in the Cotton Kingdom

This bold reaccounting dramatically alters our understanding of American slavery and its role in U.S. expansionism, global capitalism, and the upcoming Civil War.


Thursday, February 28 2013

A Great and Monstrous Thing: London in the Eighteenth Century

White introduces us to shopkeepers and prostitutes, men and women of fashion and genius, street-robbers and thief-takers, as they play out the astonishing drama of life in 18th century London.


Thursday, February 14 2013

Jelly Roll, Bix, and Hoagy: Gennett Records and the Rise of America’s Musical Grassroots

Gennett Records produced thousands of records and debuted such stars as Louis Armstrong, King Oliver, Bix Biederbecke, Jelly Roll Morton, Hoagy Carmichael, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Charley Patton, and Gene Autry.


Thursday, December 13 2012

The Biographical Dictionary of Popular Music

An incredible and opinionated collection of celebrated cultural critic Dylan Jones’s thoughts on more than 350 of the most important artists around the world—alive and dead, big and small, at length and in brief.


Thursday, December 6 2012

Oliver Sacks’ ‘Hallucinations’

Hearing voices? Don’t worry, the revered Dr. Oliver Sacks assures, in that regard at least, you’re perfectly sane.


Thursday, November 29 2012

‘The First Four Notes: Beethoven’s Fifth and the Human Imagination’

Music Historian Matthew Guerrieri traces the origins and influence of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, weaving a fascinating piece of musical detective work.


Thursday, November 15 2012

Reinventing Bach

An electrifying story of how musicians of genius have made Bach’s music new in our time, at once restoring Bach as a universally revered composer and revolutionizing the ways that music figures into our lives.


Thursday, November 8 2012

The Entertainer: Movies, Magic, and My Father’s Twentieth Century

Using the life and career of her father, an early Hollywood actor, New Yorker writer Margaret Talbot tells the thrilling story of the rise of popular culture through a transfixing personal lens.


Thursday, November 1 2012

Instant: The Story of Polaroid

Instant tells the tale of a one-of-a-kind invention-from Polaroid's first instant camera in 1948, to its meteoric rise in popularity and adoption by artists such as Ansel Adams, Andy Warhol, and Chuck Close, to the company's bankruptcy in the late '90s and its unlikely resurrection in the digital age.


Thursday, October 25 2012

Trick or Treat: A History of Halloween

Halloween has spread around the globe to places as diverse as Russia, China, and Japan, but its association with death and the supernatural and its inevitable commercialization has made it one of our most misunderstood holidays.


Thursday, October 18 2012

The Big Screen: The Story of the Movies

At first, film was a waking dream, delivered for a nickel to huddled masses sitting in the dark. But soon movies began transforming our societies and our perceptions of the world.


Thursday, October 11 2012

Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat

Since prehistory, humans have braved sharp knives, fire, and grindstones to transform raw ingredients into something delicious—or at least edible. Tools shape what we eat, but they have also transformed how we consume, and how we think about, our food.


Thursday, September 27 2012

The Missile Next Door: The Minuteman in the American Heartland

How rural Americans of all political stripes were drafted to fight the Cold War by living with nuclear missiles in their backyards—and what that tells us about enduring political divides and the persistence of defense spending.


Thursday, September 20 2012

The Victory Lab: The Secret Science of Winning Campaigns

Armed with research from behavioral psychology and randomized experiments that treat voters as unwitting guinea pigs, the smartest campaigns now believe they know who you will vote for even before you do.


Thursday, September 13 2012

Darkest America: Black Minstrelsy from Slavery to Hip-Hop

An exploration and celebration of a controversial tradition that, contrary to popular opinion, is alive and active after more than 150 years.


Thursday, September 6 2012

A New Kind of Bleak: Journeys Through Urban Britain

Owen Hatherley writes with unrivalled aggression about the disarray of modern Britain, and yet this remains a book about possibilities remembered, about unlikely successes in the midst of seemingly inexorable failure.


Thursday, August 30 2012

The Man Who Sold the World: David Bowie and the 1970s

Dissecting close to 250 songs, Peter Doggett traces the major themes that inspired and shaped Bowie's career, from his flirtations with fascist imagery and infatuation with the occult to the creation of his alter-ego, Ziggy Stardust.


Thursday, August 23 2012

The Last Bohemia: Scenes from the Life of Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Tight, passionate, and provocative, The Last Bohemia is at once a celebration of the fever dream of bohemia, a lament for what Williamsburg has become, and a cautionary tale about the lurching transformations of city neighborhoods.


Thursday, August 16 2012

In ‘America the Philosophical’ We Learn That America Is to Philosophy What Italy Is to Art—Really

America today towers as the most philosophical culture in the history of the world, an unprecedented marketplace of truth and argument that far surpasses ancient Greece or any other place one can name. Don’t believe it? Read on!


Thursday, August 9 2012

Dyn-o-mite!: Good Times, Bad Times, Our Times—A Memoir

Starting in small clubs and eventually opening for Black Panther rallies, Jimmie Walker became an icon, playing J. J. on Good Times. He was the first successful young black sitcom star, and his catchphrase -- “Dyn-o-mite!” -- remains an indicator of the era.


Thursday, August 2 2012

What Is Privacy and Are We Even Able to Say?

Harper’s contributing ed. Garret Keizer considers the moral dimensions of privacy in relation to issues of social justice, economic inequality, and the increasing commoditization of the global marketplace.


Thursday, July 26 2012

J. Edgar Hoover Goes to the Movies: The FBI and the Origins of Hollywood’s Cold War

Between 1942 and 1958, J. Edgar Hoover's FBI conducted a sweeping investigation of the motion picture industry to expose Hollywood's alleged subversion of "the American Way" through its depiction of social problems, class differences, and alternative political ideologies.


Thursday, July 19 2012

The Battle for the Arab Spring: Revolution, Counter-Revolution and the Making of a New Era

Through research, interviews, and firsthand experience, the authors analyze the challenges many Arab nations face in building democratic institutions, finding consensus on political Islam and overcoming tribal divides.


Thursday, July 12 2012

The Violinist’s Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code

Genes explain those crazy cat ladies, why some have no fingerprints, and why others survive nuclear bombs. Genes give some flexibility in their thumbs and fingers, and they might then become truly singular violinists. Sam Kean explains human history and whimsy while showing how DNA influences our species' future.


Monday, July 2 2012

Live Fast Die Young: Misadventures in Rock ‘n’ Roll America

A tale of friendship tested to the limit, noble myths, love lost and found, perfect lyrics, and good times as two friends from London drive across the US to pay homage to the roots of Rock and Roll.


Thursday, June 28 2012

Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City

At the peak of its popularity, go-go could be heard around the US capital every night of the week, on college campuses and in crumbling historic theaters, hole-in-the-wall nightclubs, back yards, and city parks.


Friday, June 22 2012

Satisfaction Not Guaranteed: Dilemmas of Progress in Modern Society

Employing his trademark inquiry of emotions in American history, Peter Stearns asks why, if modern life has been generally characterized by measurable themes of progress, abundance, and improvement, are people not happier or more content with their lot in life?


Thursday, June 14 2012

America, You Sexy Bitch: A Love Letter to Freedom

Meghan McCain and Michael Ian Black barely know each other. But they are about to change the way politics are discussed in America. Or at least the way politics are discussed in their crappy RV on this month-long road trip.


Thursday, May 31 2012

The Day the World Discovered the Sun: An Extraordinary Story of 18th-Century Scientific Adventure

Herein are the tales of three dangerous Venus Transit voyages that risked every mortal peril—a quest that raced to an unforgettable climax, when the universe suddenly became much larger than anyone had dared to imagine.


Thursday, May 24 2012

Patriot of Persia: Muhammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup

In 1953, the American and British intelligence agencies launched a coup in Iran against a bedridden 72-year-old man. Muhammad Mossadegh's crimes had been to flirt with communism and to nationalize his country's oil industry, which for 40 years had been in British hands. Mossadegh must go.


Thursday, May 17 2012

The Ball: Discovering the Object of the Game

Anthropologist John Fox sets off on a worldwide adventure to the farthest reaches of the globe and the deepest recesses of our ancient past to answer a question inspired by his sports-loving son: "Why do we play ball?"


Thursday, May 10 2012

Fat, Drunk, and Stupid: The Inside Story Behind the Making of Animal House

In 1976 the creators of National Lampoon, America’s most popular humor magazine, decided to make a movie.


Wednesday, May 2 2012

Seeing the Light: Inside the Velvet Underground

With exclusive new interviews from Velvet Underground, this is a captivating account of one of the most influential groups in rock history.


Thursday, April 26 2012

The Omnivorous Mind: Our Evolving Relationship with Food

We humans eat a wide array of plants and animals, but unlike other omnivores we eat with our minds as much as our stomachs.


Thursday, April 19 2012

Squeeze This!: A Cultural History of the Accordion in America

No other instrument has witnessed such a dramatic rise to popularity -- and precipitous decline -- as the accordion. Squeeze This! is the first history of the piano accordion and the first book-length study of the accordion as a uniquely American musical and cultural phenomenon.


Thursday, April 12 2012

The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin

A chilling account of how a low-level, small-minded KGB operative ascended to the Russian presidency and, in an astonishingly short time, destroyed years of progress and made his country once more a threat to her own people and to the world.


Thursday, April 5 2012

The Story of English in 100 Words

English language expert David Crystal takes readers on a tour of the winding byways of our language via the rude, the obscure and the downright surprising.


Thursday, March 29 2012

Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power

Written with bracing wit and intelligence, Rachel Maddow's Drift argues that we've drifted away from America's original ideals and become a nation weirdly at peace with perpetual war, with all the financial and human costs that entails.


Thursday, March 22 2012

Henry Mancini: Reinventing Film Music

Henry Mancini has sold 30 million albums and won four Oscars and 20 Grammy awards. Through Mancini, mere background music in movies became part of pop culture -- an expression of sophistication and wit with a modern sense of cool and a lasting lyricism that has not dated.


Thursday, March 15 2012

Close to the Machine: Technophilia and Its Discontents

This reprint of the cult classic memoir, based on Ellen Ullman’s early years as a computer programmer, reaffirms the reach and relevance of her thoughts on technology and creativity. Her insight is also foresight, and her story remains immediate, critical – and very entertaining.


Thursday, March 8 2012

Africa Speaks, America Answers: Modern Jazz in Revolutionary Times

Four jazz musicians from Brooklyn, Ghana, and South Africa demonstrate how modern Africa reshaped jazz, how modern jazz helped form a new African identity, and how such musical crossings altered the politics and culture of both continents.


Thursday, March 1 2012

The Grey Album: On the Blackness of Blackness

From gospel to soul, funk to freestyle, Kevin Young sifts through the shadows, the bootleg, the remix, the grey areas of our history, literature, and music.


Thursday, February 23 2012

Gil Scott-Heron’s ‘The Last Holiday’

This posthumous memoir provides Scott-Heron’s keen insights into the music industry, the civil rights movement, modern America, governmental hypocrisy, and our wider place in the world.


Thursday, February 16 2012

The End of Money: Counterfeiters, Preachers, Techies Dreamers—and the Coming Cashless Society

The usefulness of physical money -- to say nothing of its value -- is coming under fire as never before. Told with verve and wit, this book explores an aspect of our daily lives so fundamental that we rarely stop to think about it. You’ll never look at a dollar bill the same again.


Thursday, January 12 2012

The Sexual History of London

If Paris is the city of love, then London is the city of lust. From the bath houses of Roman Londinium to the sexual underground of the 20th century and beyond, this is an entertaining, vibrant chronicle of London and sex through the ages.


Wednesday, December 14 2011

Fug You: An Informal History of the Peace Eye Bookstore, the Fuck You Press, the Fugs…

This is an unapologetic and hilarious account of eight key years of "total assault on the culture", to quote William S. Burroughs.


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