Articles tagged annette bening, luce, george cukor, meg ryan, comedy, women

Projecting Delusions: Two French New Wave Masters on the Dangers of Film

The World's Most Beautiful Swindlers and Ophélia will satisfy buffs who must track down previously obscure items from the French New Wave.

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Being All Things by Being Nothing: The Enigma of ‘Being There’

Being There provides a gentle rumination on the aimless beauty of hope.

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A Lighter Touch in “Eat, Pray, Liv” Episode Helps ‘iZombie’ Move Forward

This episode puts a great deal in motion, yet iZombie never feels slowed down by too much plot.

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‘Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown’ and Knowing How Far to Go Too Far

Some films disavow their own filmic presence, they attempt to be subtle by staying out of the way; this is not one of those films.

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Living the Blues in ‘Chilly Scenes of Winter’

A sensitively framed composition of human nature, Chilly Scenes of Winter reveals the desires and neuroses that drive men to the brink.

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‘iZombie’: “Zombie Knows Best” Is a Signature Mix of Humor and Pathos

"Zombie Knows Best" balances Buckley's hilarious performance with the tonally different Clive flashbacks without missing a beat.

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‘About Time’ Is the Donald Trump of Romantic Comedies

About Time professes to celebrate life, but instead celebrates perhaps the most narcissistic, selfish behaviour ever rendered in film.

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‘Colossal’ Stomps Along Its Own Quirky Path

Nacho Vigalondo’s monster dramedy is an intoxicating mix of the sublime and the surreal.

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In Praise of Comedy Films That Aren’t Funny

A look at the rather funnily not funny films, Blast-Off and Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood.

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‘Win It All’ Plays It Safe

In Joe Swanberg’s latest amiable amble of a comedy, Jake Johnson plays a broke gambling addict who tries not so hard to do the right thing.

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Broadway’s ‘The Play that Goes Wrong’ Is More Tiresome Than Winsome

The Play That Goes Wrong aims for oversized laughs via an outlandish caricature of a murder-mystery performed within.

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“Heaven Just Got a Little Bit Smoother” Eases Us Into ‘iZombie’ Season 3

"Heaven Just Got a Little Smoother" both catches us up and quickly drops the audience back into the high stakes facing these characters.

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‘Colossal’, Monsters, TV and You

Among other things, Colossal asks you to consider your own responsibility for what and how you watch.

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SFIFF 2017: ‘Landline’ - Disfunction and Difficult Transitions in the ‘90s

Landline relishes its '90s setting, focusing on face-to-face interaction over the emotionally isolating communicative technology used today, as a means for exploring larger issues.

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Cheech Marin, a Singular Renaissance Man, Talks About Comedy, Pottery, Pot, Art and His New Memoir

Cheech Marin is a singular type of Renaissance man.

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‘Dirk Gently’ Season One Violates the Spirit of Its Source Material

Douglas Adams' Dirk Gently books were popular with fans, but this new BBC series strays too far from the spirit of the material to be considered a true adaptation.

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21 Mar 2017 // 9:30 AM

It’s Not Easy to Love Netflix’s ‘Love’

A hip, East L.A. backdrop, an indie soundtrack, fashionable faces -- yet Love is shockingly archaic in its depictions of heterosexual relationships.

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Ken Russell’s ‘The Boy Friend’ Razzle-Dazzles ‘em

Russell loves the homely spit-and-bailing-wire reality as much as the polished eye-popping fantasy of theatre.

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Black Comedy Comes in Many Colors in ‘What a Way to Go!’

A widescreen '60s splash of groovy death humor.

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‘Orange Is the New Black’ and Ethnic and Racial Differences Within the Latinx Community

One of the most important messages of this show is that race is not all encompassing, but rather, it intersects with gender, sexuality, class, religion, and region in diverse ways.

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//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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