Articles tagged atheism, agnosticism, religion, history

Hello, Hypocrisy, My Old Friend: ‘The Religion of the Future’

Roberto Mangabeira Unger eats his own tail in his helpless "new" synthesis of philosophy, religion, and politics.

READ more
Martin Luther’s Rise from Small-town Theologian to Bold and Defiant Heretic

A World Ablaze is an edifying treat for any general reader looking to get acquainted with the towering but very human figure of Martin Luther.

READ more
‘The Weight of Ink’ Is a Shining Example of Historical Fiction’s Best Qualities

Through its three protagonists, The Weight of Ink questions what it means to be alive, to love, and to be fulfilled.

READ more
Exploring Sacred Space with Jesse Jacob’s ‘Crawl Space’

Evocative of Edwin Abbott’s Flatland, Jacobs takes on environmental destruction, the desecration of the sacred, and the arrogance and selfishness that plague our politics and our world.

READ more
The Western Genre Feels Like Home: Dutch ‘Brimstone’ Director Martin Koolhoven

"I can't deny the fact I am influenced by westerns... I was determined to do something that had not been done before."

READ more

28 Sep 2017 // 9:30 AM

TIFF 2017: Woman Walks Ahead

This film confuses different types of oppression, and seems to propose that people who’ve experienced misogyny are uniquely qualified to understand racism and vice versa.

READ more
Bettany Hughes’ ‘Istanbul’ Evokes the Past and Compels the Future

This learned and lively book by award-winning historian, author, and broadcaster Bettany Hughes offers a riveting biography of a city that has remained relevant for well over two millennia.

READ more
Cromulons and Headists: Finding Religion in ‘Rick and Morty’

Rick and Morty can't resist the tug of religion in its dark and expletive-filled sci-fi universe.

READ more
‘Arithmetic’ Delightfully Yields Anything But Obvious Results

What looks like a simple topic becomes a surprising trip into unexpected worlds in Paul Lockhart's beautifully executed Arithmetic.

READ more
Franz Hessel’s ’ Reprinted Walking in Berlin’ Celebrates the Observant Urban Stroller

Reading Walking in Berlin is the next best thing to traveling back in time to visit the capital of the Weimar Republic as it was in 1929.

READ more
Whom to Love and Whom to Hate in War and Film? Interview With ‘Land of Mine’ Director and Cast

"I have always been drawn to the flip side of the coin. My other two movies are also about the demons, the hate, and the betrayal," says Martin Zandvliet.

READ more
You May Be Black or You May Be White But in Africa You’re an American First

David Peterson del Mar explores a creation myth for a nation of black people still searching for personal and collective terra firma.

READ more
‘Printer’s Error’ Is a Hilarious Romp Through Publishing History

Rare book specialists (and Pawn Stars consultants) J.P. and Rebecca Romney craft an amusing narrative full of spite, blood, and the world’s first (pre)internet troll.

READ more
Lost Chords, Major Chords, Minor Chords, Dissonant Counter-melodies: ‘Dreaming the Beatles’

This biography of the Beatles illustrates how their personality dynamics served as both a necessary elixir and an addictive poison in the creation of their music.

READ more

1 Aug 2017 // 2:30 AM

‘Dunkirk’ Is an Allegory of Resilience for Our Age

Christopher Nolan’s film is not primarily a patriotic tale of superior character, but rather a celebration simply of the universal ability to endure.

READ more
Kathryn Bigelow’s Intense ‘Detroit’ Finds a Glimmer of Hope Amidst the Hopelessness

This is no one's neighborhood. Detroit doesn’t help anyone to feel at home, least of all viewers.

READ more
‘Heretics!’ Illustrates the Contentiousness Surrounding Philosophy

Heretics! is an original and thoughtful book, sliding somewhere between academic text, layperson’s introduction, and popular philosophy, with a unique, illustrated, twist.

READ more
‘Dunkirk’: “The Bodies Come Back”

Dunkirk turns war movie tropes inside out to articulate a broader theme, not only the truism that war is excruciating, but more profoundly, that war is always the same, that it repeats, that it cannot be won.

READ more
When American Women’s Dreams of Equality Carried Them to Russia

By uncovering lost stories of women living abroad, Julia Mickenberg revives rich histories of adventure.

READ more
‘Dunkirk’ Is a Masterpiece of Overwhelming Realism

As uplifting as it is unrelenting, Christopher Nolan’s epic war thriller unites everyone in the most basic of objectives: survive to fight another day.

READ more
More Recent Articles
//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

READ the article