Articles tagged atheism, agnosticism, religion, history

Never Forget: Angela Sarafyan On ‘The Promise’ and The Armenian Genocide

Best known for her memorable work on Westworld, Sarafyan discusses her new film, The Promise, an epic memorial to the Armenian Genocide.

READ more
Romance and Genocide Don’t Mix in ‘The Promise’

One can argue about director Terry George's decision to focus on love in this milieu, but there’s no denying his execution fails on both a thematic and a narrative level.

READ more
Istanbul: From Emperors to Street Vendors

Historian Thomas F. Madden's Istanbul leaves one with a sense of awe for how much of the human experience is on display in this one city, in this part of the world.

READ more
It Takes a Village to Put a Man on the Moon: An Interview With the Creator’s of ‘Mission Control’

Director David Fairhead and Executive Producer Keith Haviland of Mission Control marvel at the men behind the first man on the moon.

READ more
Idealism to Mass Murder in ‘The Road to Jonestown’

The author of Manson tracks how Jim Jones’ tragic magnetism and promises of racial solidarity and socialist utopia pulled hundreds of people into his fatal orbit.

READ more
The Story of Hemingway and Dos Passos Is as Exciting as Any of Their Novels

The Ambulance Drivers tells of how Hemingway would use literature to seize the world and Dos Passos would use literature to change it.

READ more
‘Electri_City’ Is Missing the Spark

It took a lot of work in the '70s to make music that sounded like it was created entirely by robots. The same could be said for Electri_City.

READ more
Hire More of Us, Please: Niki Caro Talks ‘The Zookeeper’s Wife’ and the Hollywood Gender Gap

Director Niki Caro shares her perspective on the film industry gender gap and the extraordinary story that inspired The Zookeeper's Wife.

READ more
Jessica Chastain Is Radiant in Hit-and-miss WWII Drama, ‘The Zookeeper’s Wife’

Good-hearted but artistically uninspired, Niki Caro's WWII drama fails to milk its source material for all its dramatic potential.

READ more
Martin Scorsese Gives His Own Voice to ‘Silence’

Martin Scorsese's quiet religious epic gives a definitive take on a book that thrives in its ambiguity.

READ more
Jazz, Loss, and Understanding in ‘I Called Him Morgan’

While exposing the fragments and fault lines of memories, I Called Him Morgan tells the stories of Helen and Lee Morgan. It's also a story of storytelling.

READ more
‘Frantz’ Unfolds Elegantly Into a Haunting Meditation on Xenophobia and Acceptance

Franz Ozon again proves to be a most singular voice in world cinema with this deceptively haunting romance mystery.

READ more
These ‘70s Avant-Garde Jazz Musicians Blew Freely, Fiercely, and Reverently

These cats blew all night and day a new, astonishing page into the jazz lexicon. What they couldn't do was get gigs in jazz clubs.

READ more
The Country and the Metropolis: Thomas Hardy, a Divided Man

Mark Ford's compelling study offers the first thorough account of Thomas Hardy as "a London Man".

READ more
‘The Tree of Wooden Clogs’ Is Extraordinary in Its Depiction of Tenant Farmers

In a world of absolutes and cruel consequences, if an entire family’s future is destroyed due to the cutting of a single tree, then that’s simply how things are.

READ more
‘The Book of the Dead’ Reflects the Complexity of Its Author and His Times

Orikuchi Shinobu's work helps to illustrate the power of fiction and literature to bring to life -- quite literally, in this case -- academic theories surrounding religion, folklore and sociology.

READ more
‘The Sound of the One Hand’: Ancient Mysteries (Sort of) Revealed

Can a religious text be revolutionary if it's also inscrutable?

READ more
The “Good Old Days” of TV Are Happening Right Now

Why American television is better now than it's ever been -- and the unexpected paths by which it got there.

READ more
‘Land of Mine’ Explores the Intolerable Costs of Nationalistic Vengeance

Land of Mine is perhaps the most powerful denunciation of nationalism's destructive force as we'll see on movie screens in 2017.

READ more
‘Aleksandr Sokurov: Russian Ark’ Serves as a Succinct Companion to the Landmark Film

At once a production history, a film analysis and a history of the Hermitage Museum, the Chair of the Film Studies at Aberystwyth University has written a concise and thought-provoking volume.

READ more
More Recent Articles

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Moving Pixels Podcast Becomes the 'Beholder'

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to think that we would never be complicit with the dictates of an authoritarian regime, but Beholder reveals how complicated such choices can become.

READ the article