Articles tagged atheism, agnosticism, religion, history

Transience Permeates the Introspective Pages in ‘Turkey Rediscovered’

Where Job scraped his sores, where Xenophon crossed the Euphrates, Krause Reichert links the stories he knows well to their terrain and traces.

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Richard Dawkins and the Need for a New Science Populism

Now, more than ever, public intellectual scientists like Dawkins are needed to counter the forces of faith, fiction, and farce dominating our so-called “post-fact” society.

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BFI’s Release of Abel Gance’s ‘Napoléon’ Does Justice to a Masterpiece

The BFI’s restoration of Gance’s groundbreaking, grandiloquent 1927 epic is one of the year’s most highly anticipated Blu-ray releases.

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In Martin Scorsese’s ‘Silence’, Is God Even Listening?

Hunted Jesuit missionaries in 17th-century Japan wrestle with the possibility that all their suffering, and that of their persecuted followers, could be meaningless.

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‘Patriots Day’ Is Heavy With Exasperating Fiction

Tommy (Mark Wahlberg) embodies a troubling fiction, the one where one man can "fix it". Sometimes, that fiction is inspiring. Sometimes, it's exasperating.

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Trumpaholism, or, Is “Liquor Before Beer, Never Fear” a Piece of Fake News?

How I worry when I drink, and why Distilled Knowledge is diffuse knowledge.

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Michael Chabon’s ‘Moonglow’ Is a Big, Fat (Fun), Lie

Chabon merges his earlier and more recent literary profiles in a vivid, at times explosively entertaining, and occasionally schizophrenic novel about history, memory, and family.

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Private Goes Public in Miklós Janscó‘s ‘Private Vices, Public Virtues’

With this highly contentious erotic drama, Miklós Janscó fashions a most insular story of sexual freedom with an impenitent degree of self-indulgence.

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‘Village Atheists’ Engagingly Explores a Persecuted American Minority

Nonbelief in America has enjoyed a certain amount of social progress, thanks to the three men and one woman profiled in Village Atheists.

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Nutty Professors? The Case for Scientist-Humorists in the Culture Wars

It's time for the personalities of the science community to emerge from their labs and to get into the ring.

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‘Television: A Biography’ Showcases How TV Is an Insanely Mutative Beast

David Thomson's lucrative and exhaustive biography of television reminds us that the continuously morphing state of TV matches our increasingly digitally-enhanced society.

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‘Brief Histories of Everyday Objects’ Ponders, What’s Up With the Toothbrush?

In comic form, Brief Histories of Everyday Objects puts everyday objects under clever ideological scrutiny.

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A Kick Ass/Kick Arse Depiction of the Stylish Mods in ‘60s England

Jim McCarthy and Kevin Cross, writers and graphics artists from either side of the Atlantic, join forces to create a candid tale of the Mod scene.

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‘The Fate of Rural Hell’: A Field Trip to a Bizarre, Religious Disneyland

Anderson gives just enough about the history of Thailand and the perspective of Buddhism to let a reader’s imagination take flight.

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The Mexican Journey That Made One of the 20th Century’s Finest Writers

Sybille Bedford's account of her remarkable year in Mexico is the perfect introduction to one of the 20th century's most remarkable writers.

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Play Out the Play: Orson Welles’ Chimes at Midnight

Bursting with vertiginous momentum, Chimes at Midnight presents a wonderfully sociable anti-sociality.

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Criterion Draws Fresh Restorations From Welles With ‘Chimes at Midnight’ and ‘The Immortal Story’

In his late period, Orson Welles was just getting started.

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Tower Records in a Nutshell: ‘All Things Must Pass’

A nostalgic and warm look at a defunct record chain that brings the real substance and heart of the rise and fall.

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The Sustaining Lure of the Paris Commune

Today's equivalent to the Paris Commune is a New York in which Zucotti Park did not merely occupy Wall Street but burned it to the ground, hung the bankers, and opened the borders.

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How Does the Mind of the Political Reactionary Work?

Mark Lilla notes in The Shipwrecked Mind, “Apocalyptic historiography never goes out of style.”

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Stone Dead: Murder and Myth in 'Medousa'

// Short Ends and Leader

"A wry tale which takes in Greek mythology, punk rock and influences of American suspense-drama, this is an effective and curious thriller about myth and obsession.

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