Articles tagged china, history, travel

What Can Women do? Pretty Much Anything: ‘Wonder Women’

"We have to get the stories of these women out into the world. Because representation matters."

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‘Apollo in the Age of Aquarius’: Bringing the Space Race Back Down to Earth

Looking at NASA's interactions with the social movements of the '60s offers a new perspective on that landmark era in America.

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China Mieville’s ‘October’: The Bolsheviks Are Back in Vogue

What was the secret of the Russian Revolution? What lessons -- both positive and negative -- does it hold for the present day?

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Award-winning Cinematography Enriches François Ozon’s ‘Frantz’

Impressive camerawork draws viewers close to characters whose lives have been turned upside down by World War I.

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Summer Turns to Fall: Revisiting the ‘Summer of Love’ 50 Years Later

Summer of Love simultaneously demonstrates why that moment in the cultural timeline is worth commemorating, what its legacy is, and what was lost as summer turned to fall.

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On Norman Mailer, Jack Henry Abbott, and the Legacy of Going Too Deep Into the Belly of the Beast

How Norman Mailer, while preparing 1979's The Executioner's Song, collaborated with Jack Henry Abbott and opened doors that should have remained shut.

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Alexander Theroux’s ‘Einstein’s Beets’ Is an Acquired Taste

Einstein's Beets digs up animal and spiritual drives that lure us to gorge and stir us to gag.

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Never Forget: Angela Sarafyan On ‘The Promise’ and The Armenian Genocide

Best known for her memorable work on Westworld, Sarafyan discusses her new film, The Promise, an epic memorial to the Armenian Genocide.

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Romance and Genocide Don’t Mix in ‘The Promise’

One can argue about director Terry George's decision to focus on love in this milieu, but there’s no denying his execution fails on both a thematic and a narrative level.

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Istanbul: From Emperors to Street Vendors

Historian Thomas F. Madden's Istanbul leaves one with a sense of awe for how much of the human experience is on display in this one city, in this part of the world.

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It Takes a Village to Put a Man on the Moon: An Interview With the Creator’s of ‘Mission Control’

Director David Fairhead and Executive Producer Keith Haviland of Mission Control marvel at the men behind the first man on the moon.

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Idealism to Mass Murder in ‘The Road to Jonestown’

The author of Manson tracks how Jim Jones’ tragic magnetism and promises of racial solidarity and socialist utopia pulled hundreds of people into his fatal orbit.

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The Story of Hemingway and Dos Passos Is as Exciting as Any of Their Novels

The Ambulance Drivers tells of how Hemingway would use literature to seize the world and Dos Passos would use literature to change it.

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‘Electri_City’ Is Missing the Spark

It took a lot of work in the '70s to make music that sounded like it was created entirely by robots. The same could be said for Electri_City.

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Hire More of Us, Please: Niki Caro Talks ‘The Zookeeper’s Wife’ and the Hollywood Gender Gap

Director Niki Caro shares her perspective on the film industry gender gap and the extraordinary story that inspired The Zookeeper's Wife.

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Jessica Chastain Is Radiant in Hit-and-miss WWII Drama, ‘The Zookeeper’s Wife’

Good-hearted but artistically uninspired, Niki Caro's WWII drama fails to milk its source material for all its dramatic potential.

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Martin Scorsese Gives His Own Voice to ‘Silence’

Martin Scorsese's quiet religious epic gives a definitive take on a book that thrives in its ambiguity.

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Jazz, Loss, and Understanding in ‘I Called Him Morgan’

While exposing the fragments and fault lines of memories, I Called Him Morgan tells the stories of Helen and Lee Morgan. It's also a story of storytelling.

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‘Frantz’ Unfolds Elegantly Into a Haunting Meditation on Xenophobia and Acceptance

Franz Ozon again proves to be a most singular voice in world cinema with this deceptively haunting romance mystery.

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‘Tharlo’ Is a Slow-moving Allegory About Innocence lost

Pema Tseden's Tharlo presents an allegory of Tibet and China in the guise of a film noir story set in Thailand

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The Moving Pixels Podcast Discusses 'Tales from the Borderlands Episode 2'

// Moving Pixels

"Our foray into the adventure-game-style version of the Borderlands continues.

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