Articles tagged china, history, travel

Queen Said It Best: We Are the Champions

The Invaders considers the tenuous position of the planet's top dogs.

READ more

23 Jun 2015 // 2:05 AM

The Banality of Destiny

Fateful Ties is exhaustive and exhaustingly catalogued history of the US' aggressively narcissistic relationship with China.

READ more
On Tony Judt’s Endless Train

Be suspicious of romantic narratives, Judt reminds us, for they will only derail our understanding, and take us nowhere.

READ more
In ‘Theatre of the Unimpressed’, Failure Is the Great Subversion

Jordan Tannahill's book is full of provocative insights and exciting examples of theatre that is striving to resist the mediocrity that bores audiences the world over.

READ more
‘Assassin’s Creed Chronicles: China’ Tells Too Much Story

Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China is a game bursting at the seams with story, but not in a good way.

READ more
Nobody Won the ‘War for the Soul of America’

Andrew Hartman’s engaging exploration of the culture wars confirms that the conflicts will never be resolved because both sides are too extreme for America's moderate middle-ground.

READ more
‘Teaching Plato in Palestine’ Marks a Valiant Effort, but Falls Short of Consolation

Carlos Fraenkel champions two causes: the first is a culture of debate; the second is an allegiance to the principle of fallibilism. Unfortunately, both are hard to come by.

READ more
‘Rigor Mortis’ Doesn’t Have the Decency to Scare Its Audience

It wouldn't seem possible to make a dour movie about China's famous "hopping vampires", but somehow Juno Mak has done it.

READ more
Brother Against Brother: The Drawing of the Sword

The game doesn't portray brothers fighting brothers. It shows pieces on a map easing into firing range of one another with the objective of causing more casualties than they suffer.

READ more
Fateful Ties: A History of America’s Preoccupation With China

Spanning fascination and fear, ideas about China have long been embedded in America’s conception of itself and its own fate.

READ more
The Power of the Reader in ‘A History of Reading’

Alberto Manguel takes a thematic rather than linear approach to a history of reading, offering an entertaining and impassioned account of reading practices and readers' agency.

READ more
‘Voyaging in Strange Seas’ Tells of the Deep, Wide Roots of Modern Science

The history of the Scientific Revolution, retold: Clear, detailed, and as overwhelming as drinking from a fire hose.

READ more
‘Boy in the Twilight: Stories of the Hidden China’ Is both Trivial and Expansive

There is nothing hidden about the world of these stories, and Yu Hua’s writing is defined by its plainspoken voice and depiction of quotidian lives.

READ more
Shigeru Mizuki’s ‘Showa’ Is a Melting Pot of Manga, Photo Realism, Memoir & Narrative History

A Japanese period of heightened tension, military marches, and personal discovery.

READ more
‘Savage Continent’ Explodes the Myths Behind the ‘Greatest Generation’

Keith Lowe has synthesized the latest scholarship to explore the unprecedented physical and moral destruction of Europe after World War II.

READ more
Why ‘Game of Thrones’ Matters

George R.R. Martin's series looks and feels like a historical drama, except the audience doesn't know how the story will turn out. Martin's 'fantasy' is preoccupied with power -- its relations, differentials and dynamics -- because he's interested in the way 'history' is really made.

READ more
Standing at the Edge of a Cliff: China in Two Books

Like the scene in romantic movies where two lovers see each other from across a crowded room and begin running towards one another, culturally the US seems to be rushing towards China as fast as China is rushing towards the US.

READ more
‘Masters of Doom’ A Great Man History of Gaming

In recounting the rise of John Carmack and John Romero, Masters of Doom chronicles two of video games' most influential creators and documents pivotal years in the medium's history.

READ more
Barbarians Against Barbarians: Henry Kissinger’s ‘On China’

The diplomat believes he’s a skillful player, he believes he’s in control; but the game is much bigger than he is, and defines what he can and cannot do.

READ more
‘The Origins of Political Order’ Is Delightfully Bipartisan and Sure to Raise Eyebrows

The esteemed political scientist's latest book provides a thought-provoking look at the political history of past civilizations, and is sure to offer plenty of fodder for conversations about the present.

READ more
More Recent Articles
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Double Take: 'The French Connection' (1971)

// Short Ends and Leader

"You pick your feet in Poughkeepsie, and we pick The French Connection for Double Take #18.

READ the article