Articles tagged civil rights

“To Penetrate the Fug of Things”: On Trump’s Response to Charlottesville

Rationality, in the moral sense, is an act of love because it is an attempt to bring the world closer, not drive it away. Rationality is not an inherent human trait, it is a choice.

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The Old Dominion in Song: Clipse and the Virginia Schism

Though the trappings may be different, the rhetoric layered beneath Lord Willin’ is a borrowed form of dubious justification that reeks of the Virginia slave system.

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The Most Hated Woman in America: An Interview With Filmmakers Irene Turner and Tommy O’Haver

PopMatters spoke with writer Irene Turner and director Tommy O'Haver during SXSW 2017 about the remarkable life and death of Madalyn Murray O'Hair.

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SXSW 2017: Ferguson Documentary’s New Footage Sparks Debate

Even before the start of the screening and world premiere of Stranger Fruit, the documentary about the shooting of Michael Brown, the room was charged with emotion.

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Conscience of Congress John Lewis Hopes You’ll ‘Get in the Way’ of Things

Lewis’s lifelong philosophy on civil disobedience is admirable and urgent. Interview with Get in the Way Director, Kathleen Dowdey.

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Harry Belafonte and the Art of Activism

Harry Belafonte's life and work looms large over this moment, when artists of color are exercising their activist voices.

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Racializing Rock: The ‘60s and the White Sounds of ‘Pet Sounds’

Pet Sounds is not a racist text, but its impact was racist because it further encoded rock as a white genre, perpetuating the institutionalized prejudice that relegated African Americans to the margins of rock.

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An Englishman in the American South

Five Southern states in 11 days: scattered views from the old world.

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‘Mavis!’ Puts Mavis Staples, and Her Influence on Music, Centre Stage

Even if Mavis! covers a lot of ground quickly, it offers an entertaining tribute to one hell of a performer.

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‘The Black Panthers: Vanguard of a Revolution’: Made for Television

Today, as US political campaigns take on communities of color -- whether trying to win or suppress their votes -- we might remember a time when Black Lives were not on TV.

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The Staple Singers: Faith & Grace: A Family Journey 1953-1976

History comes vibrantly alive on this comprehensive four-CD set of the influential family group who merged gospel, soul, and blues into a uniquely influential, perpetually uplifting sound.

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The Real Walking Dead: Joshua M. Price’s ‘Prison and Social Death’

This book is about society. Shifting the focus from the individual (crime) to the social (punishment) is not so much a political choice as it is an ethical imperative.

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‘The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution’ Is Insightful, Timely

The social crisis that helped to create the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense in the 1960s is still very much with us.

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Glenn Greenwald’s Latest Has Us Wondering Who Watches the Watchers?

'No Place to Hide' is a portrait of courage, determination, and the lengths people go to stand by their principles.

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Ethel Payne’s Abundance of Nerve

Pioneering journalist Ethel Payne witnessed – and made – history

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Nobody Won the ‘War for the Soul of America’

Andrew Hartman’s engaging exploration of the culture wars confirms that the conflicts will never be resolved because both sides are too extreme for America's moderate middle-ground.

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1965: 12 Months That Shook the World

1965 places that year's astonishing surge of innovative pop music in a larger context of social, cultural, and political change.

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Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, the First Lady of the Black Press

Ethel Payne's gripping accounts of black life in post-World War II America provided critical information that was largely missing from mainstream journalism.

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The Caging of an American Revolutionary

American Revolutionary wants to offer the appearance of revolution while anesthetizing any deeper understanding of the forces involved.

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One Must Remember the Past in Order to Rectify the Future

Jeffrey Stepakoff's The Melody of Secrets is a complex story of unrequited love, racial tensions, the space age, and the after-effects of World War II.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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