Articles tagged climate change, global warming, science fiction, sf, george guthridge, alan dean foster, bruce sterling, gregory benford

“The Only Good Bug Is a Dead Bug”: ‘Starship Troopers’ and the Politics of Science Fiction

There's little a remake of Starship Troopers could add to the original's deceptively deep insights into the nature of social organization.

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Callous Masculinity and Robot Sexuality Conflict in ‘Ex Machina’

This artificial intelligence flick uses the nerd archetype to make points about masculinity, ego, and empathy.

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‘The Lazarus Effect’ Is an 88 Minute Excuse for Exposition

Because The Lazarus Effect takes so long getting to the supposedly scary stuff, we have to stay focused on either the characters or the content, and both fail.

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Philip K. Dick’s ‘Radio Free Albemuth’ Finally Reaches the Silver Screen

Like the book that inspired it, Radio Free Albemuth works as a vindicating love letter to spiritual seekers who feel that humanity is capable of more than the Orwellian rat race.

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A Stranger in a Strange Land Considers ‘The Humans’

A dangerous-to-humankind alien finds the poetry of Emily Dickinson to be quite wonderful, enjoys the arty beauty of the Talking Heads’ second album, and develops a love for really crunchy peanut butter.

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New York City-Sourced Chaos in Graphic Novel ‘Strange Attractors’

Instability underpins this maps-and-Manhattan-centric graphic novel from Charles Soule.

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Comics Creator Matt Kindt’s ‘Fine Art’

Each page that comics creator Matt Kindt produces is marked by an ability to communicate nostalgia that is immediate and striking.

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The Beatification of Philip K. Dick

Fueled by his science fiction work, by his mystical aura and his growing legend, the cult of Philip K. Dick continues to expand.

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Hurricane Sandy: The Perfect Storm in Every Way

Hurricane Sandy was not just a freak natural occurrence -- it became the 'perfect storm' for cultural events such as conspiracy theories, religious intolerance, scientific accountability, and the sharing of (mis)information through social media.

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17 Sep 2012 // 10:14 PM

Aliens and the Women Who Love Them

If there’s one thing the alien film does well, it’s the introduction of an outsider to provide an inside glimpse at the human condition. What often gets knocked off the wayside is a myriad of underlying issues, including the continued questionable portrayal of women and, more broadly, their social status and treatment.

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‘The Twilight Zone Season 5’: A Superb Presentation of a Classic Television Series

The Image Entertainment Blu-Ray release of The Twilight Zone is a must-have for fans of the series and scholars of science fiction and the history of television.

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Comedian Albert Brooks Proclaims Some Dead Serious Divinations in ‘2030’

Despite Albert Brooks’ background in comedy, 2030, particularly in its last third, is a bit of a dour book and is meant as both a warning and a prophecy if the world continues to turn unchecked.

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The 10 Greatest Sci-Fi Film Comedies of All Time

With today's release of Simon Pegg and Nick Frost's Paul on DVD, we thought this was the perfect time to run down our choices for the funniest future shock sci-fi genre films of all time.

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The 10 Worst Sci-Fi Films of All Time

Intelligent? Forward Thinking? Epic? Not these 10 Sci-Fi Titles, a collection of speculative crap that is more fetid schlock than future shock.

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Getting ‘Spacey-Wacey’ Has Never Been Scarier—or More Fun: ‘Doctor Who: Series 6, Part 1’

Looking for a cool way to spend a few hours while waiting for the Doctor to return this August? Borrow a TARDIS, see where and why Demons Run, and meet the Doctor’s wife.

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The Death of Utopia: ‘Firefly’ and the Return to Human Realism in TV Sci-Fi

Joss Whedon's science fiction western Firefly was revolutionary in several ways, not least its embrace of a degree of realism regarding human motivation, in contrast to the utopianism of earlier TV sci-fi such as Star Trek.

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Botticelli, Sandwiches Outside and Dreams of Bradbury’s ‘Dandelion Wine’

Boxed in by bandage-colored cubicle walls in downtown Manhattan, my thoughts drift to sweet days in Florence and Rome, and to lines in Ray Bradbury’s ‘Dandelion Wine’.

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‘Close Encounters of the Third Kind’ at 34: Still Thrilling After All These Years

What makes Close Encounters of the Third Kind stand out to this day is that it isn’t the usual UFO tale of “us vs them”, like Spielberg’s later remake of War of the Worlds; rather, it's very much a story about Earthlings.

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Ray Bradbury Wrote Me Back

My affinity for Ray Bradbury's work is rooted in his "accidental novels", as well as in the collections that plunder what is seemingly a limitless vault of manuscripts.

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‘Super Sad True Love Story’, Or, The Unbearable Lightness of Being Lenny Abramov

This story depicts a world that is completely absurd and out of control, which brings a lot of dark humor into it. Yet its truly scary -- you have to wonder if this is the slippery slope the real world is headed down.

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