Articles tagged dystopia, fiction, trend

Each of the Stories in Murakami’s ‘Men Without Women’ Is a Psychological and Existential Mystery

If Lars Svendsen helps one to understand loneliness cognitively, Haruki Murakami allows one to experience it affectively, giving it a slow, desperate pulse.

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My Life May Be a Mess, But ‘Wait Till You See Me Dance’

In this excellent volume of stories, Deb Olin Unferth uses a slippery sense of perspective to stoke empathy for characters acting out.

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John Darnielle’s ‘Universal Harvester’ Holds a Mystery Within a Mystery

Universal Harvester isn't what it looks like, but part of the fun and force come in finding out what it really, maybe is.

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Fear and Loathing in Post-war Amsterdam

A bleakly funny book and a classic of Dutch literature, The Evenings tells the tale of a young man dealing with boredom and self-loathing during the last days of 1946.

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‘Exit West’ Is a Compassionate and Imaginative Fable of Migration

Mohsin Hamid rewrites the rules of time and space to tell the tale of migration in universal terms.

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‘The Glassblower’s Children’ Explores the Existential Melancholia of the Child’s World

Deep at the existentialist heart of this story there's a solemn treatise on the socially inequitable struggles between the worlds of the child and the adult.

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J.D. Wilkes Puts the American South’s Contradictions Up for Reconsideration

A novel that believes monsters are “as much a part of us as our penchant for fried chicken and turnip greens.”

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‘The White King’ Boldly Embraces Film as an Incomplete Form

Here are two storytellers that seemingly trust and embrace the cinéliterate audience to extrapolate, to understand, of their own volition.

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‘Welcome to Night Vale’ Is a “Welcome” Introduction to a Strange New World

Although it takes a while for the heart of Welcome to Night Vale to be revealed, it's ultimately worth the journey.

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This Will Be the Last Time You Hear from Me: John Darnielle’s Universal Harvester

Universal Harvester won’t shock you or stay with you for a long time, but like most found footage movies, it’ll keep you on the edge of your seat along the way.

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There’s an Impactful Tale Buried Within Emma Richler’s ‘Be My Wolff’

Richler’s details can be drearily extraneous and erudite, yet they also demonstrate how dedicated and well-researched she is in regards to her characters and the world in which they live.

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Rose Tremain’s ‘The Gustav Sonata’ Is an Honest and Sensitive Look at Human Foibles

It’s a mark of Tremain’s accomplished writing that in these relatively short chapters there's nearly always some kind of revelation or surprise, some kind of turning point.

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La Nausée in the Spanish Empire: Antonio Di Benedetto’s ‘Zama’

A servant of the Spanish crown finds himself in remote Paraguay, entertaining fantasies and delusions that clash with the actual circumstances of his position. A bleak, comic, and tragic story of alienation.

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No Country for Broken Men in Joseph Scapellato’s ‘Big Lonesome’

Even at their most impenetrable and monotonous, the stories here are still rich with refined poeticism and imagination.

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CONTEST: Win a copy of James Patterson’s ‘Humans, Bow Down’ and $100

James Patterson's new novel Humans, Bow Down shows us what happens when the world is run by machines and humans are an endangered species. Win a copy and $100.

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Paul Auster’s ‘4 3 2 1’ Has Flashes of Brilliance But Doesn’t Transcend Its Genre

The four lives of Archie Ferguson do not add up to more than the sum of their parts.

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Take a Vacation From Despair With ‘The Dark and Other Love Stories’

Deborah Willis enchants and transports with 11 stories of adolescent friendship, Canada, and birds.

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This New Translation of Yusuf Atılgan’s Work Shows a Mind Unraveling

Motherland Hotel is an astounding work by a master who makes it look easy.

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Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s ‘Reputations’ Explores the Slippery Nature of Memory

Vásquez’s work shows how reputation is its own hermetic chamber, sealing the person off from his self.

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Tim Dorsey’s Latest Gives Us Beer and Loathing in Florida

Clownfish Blues places trademark characters Serge A. Storms on arguably their wildest and funniest ride yet, resulting in plenty of sex, drugs, violence, and lottery winnings.

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Supernatural Sets the Stage for Season Finalé With “There's Something About Mary”

// Channel Surfing

"A busy episode in which at least one character dies, two become puppets, and three are trapped and left for dead in an unlikely place.

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