Articles tagged dystopia, fiction, trend

Teddy Wayne Gives Readers a Disturbing Glimpse Into the Predatory Side of a Social Outcast

Thrilling, engrossing, and infuriating, Loner harks back -- in a completely contemporary timbre -- to literary classics that create compelling portraits of repellant characters.

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Zadie Smith’s ‘Swing Time’ Does a Difficult Dance

Learning from the past is not as simple as pressing rewind: it's a dance that's quite difficult to execute.

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‘Agnes’ Is a Bleak Tale About the Misuses of Storytelling

Peter Stamm's work is an example of how stories can hold their creators in their power.

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‘Eileen’ Is a Grimly Funny and Dark Story of Breaking With the Past

Eileen is an atmospheric thriller with a seductively ugly narrative voice.

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Michael Chabon’s ‘Moonglow’ Is a Big, Fat (Fun), Lie

Chabon merges his earlier and more recent literary profiles in a vivid, at times explosively entertaining, and occasionally schizophrenic novel about history, memory, and family.

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Gayle Forman’s ‘Leave Me’ Reminded Me of Erma Bombeck’s Work

Everyone who has ever been married might see some of themselves in this story.

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Enthusiastic Dispassion in Eve Babitz’s ‘Slow Days, Fast Company’

Whether these tales are intentionally remote or the projection and appropriations of Babitz’s own afflicted desires, her ability for sagacious detail is never obscured.

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M. R. James’ Ghost Stories Work Eerily Well in This Graphic Fiction Form

Leah Moore and John Reppion deliver thrills and chills in a way that M. R. James would surely have approved of -- in shadows and by degree.

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The Mystery of ‘All That Man Is’

David Szalay's novel preserves the mystery of modern manhood within an anthology of realism.

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Pondering Life Post-Capitalism in ‘Four Futures’

Can markets be separated from capitalism? From money? From the disenfranchising effects of equating social power with money?

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Ambition, Folksy Charm, and an Alligator: ‘Carrying Albert Home’

Homer Hickman's story offers a light-hearted, ultimately feel good series of stories that are more often than not as amusing as they are poignant.

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Californium: Another Story of Adolescent Angst—With Guitars

Californium is a Frankenstein’s monster of coming-of-age stories, its many moving parts borrowed and reassembled from stock, clichéd characters and plot devices.

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Race Mixing in ‘Absalom’s Daughters’

This is not an attempt to rewrite Faulkner as much as it's a cogent effort at bringing women and people of color to the forefront of a Faulkner-inspired work.

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‘High Dive’ Balances the Momentous Event With the Human Experience

Despite the story's smoldering core about the 1984 Brighton Hotel Bombing, Lee concerns himself mostly with the periphery.

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Sex, Lies, and Sleeping Aids: ‘Scary Old Sex’

On the whole, Heyman definitely has a sharp, witty take on heterosexual relations and is attuned to the comedy inherent in the act itself.

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The Valley Unpleasant in ‘Mount Pleasant’

Ruined by blind ambition, Mount Pleasant stands as a cautionary tale to any writer possessed of more aspiration than art.

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A Society With Its Hand on the Trigger: Vicki Baum’s ‘Grand Hotel’

Vicki Baum writes of a stir-crazy people living in a world that is both swiftly and slowly emptying of its meaning.

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Richard Russo’s ‘Everybody’s Fool’ Reminds Us That Fortune Comes in Gradations

Only in Russo’s world could we hang as tightly as we do on a belief that misguided fortunes might correct themselves and turn life’s cruelties around.

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In ‘You Will Know Me,’ the Mystery is Everybody

Megan Abbott’s novel of suburban gymnastics’ competitive psychosis is like the fictional version of Joan Ryan’s excoriating Little Girls in Pretty Boxes.

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Exposition Dumps Don't Need Dialogue in 'Virginia'

// Moving Pixels

"Virginia manages to have an exposition dump without wordy exposition.

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