Articles tagged dystopia, fiction, trend

Coming-of-Age Within the Exquisite Eccentricities of Europe

A precisely refined blend of unique and hypnotic people, places, and philosophical phrasings make Bret Easton Ellis and the Other Dogs wondrously impactful and artistic.

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‘The Dressmaker’s War’ Is a Tangled Mess of Threads

Mary Chamberlain's skilled seamstress finds herself in an impossibly snarled plot.

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‘The Autobiography of James T. Kirk’: Backstories for Everyone!

Filled with in-jokes and subtle references to the show, uber-fans will love this "auto" biography of Star Trek's Captain Kirk and the stories of the people in his life.

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‘Like Family’ Unfortunately, Is a Story as Lifeless as Its Central Subject

Like Family is full of worthwhile scattered sentiments, but there isn’t enough appeal or momentum between them to make enduring the entire work worthwhile.

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Justin Richards Delivers a Mixed Bag in Doctor Who: The Time Lord Letters

This is a thick and glossy volume featuring the Doctor's correspondence across time and space.

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‘Food Whore’ Critiques the City of Dining and Deceit

Jessica Tom captures the psychology of NYC’s elite dining scene in her aspiring debut.

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A Master Storyteller Is Revealed in ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’

Lucia Berlin paints portraits of environments and people with an attentive, sympathetic and often cinematic eye.

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Charles Beaumont’s Life-Affirming Nature

Perchance to Dream, a recent collection of Charles Beaumont's short stories, is perhaps the most endearing account of his writing in decades.

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Time Keeps on Slipping Into the Future: Jane Smiley’s ‘Golden Age’

Completing Smiley's final installment of The Last Hundred Years Trilogy, we feel the peculiar sadness of missing people who don’t actually exist, and must resist the impulse to wave goodbye.

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Bruce Bauman’s Latest Is a Family Drama of Biblical Proportions

Broken Sleep is brimming with colorful characters, fascinating dialogue, and beautiful yet tragic relationships, making it easy to read and hard to forget.

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The Greater Implications of One Small Act in Ron Rash’s ‘Above the Waterfall’

If Ron Rash is, as he has been described, a "writer's writer" then Above the Waterfall might best be described as a "poet's novel", a book as enjoyable in its language as its story.

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Chuck Wendig’s ‘Zeroes’ Is a Paranoid Techno-thriller That’s Just Right for our Times

It's all too easy to see the ways that the Zeroes' security is constantly compromised, and realize that those are very natural extensions of the technology that surrounds us today.

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15 Oct 2015 // 6:30 AM

Rebel Hell

In The Rebel's Sketchbook, Rupert Dreyfus writes with the darkly absurd humour of a thirsty and somewhat paranoid Jonathan Swift.

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How Do You Define the Genre of Trans Literature?

In the late ‘90s there was an explosion of politicized art – film, video, and performance art – by trans artists. What we're seeing in literature today is a move to a much broader scale.

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Choice Shapes the World in ‘Not on Fire, But Burning’

Greg Hrbek gives us a War on Terror that's not too far from our own.

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Margaret Atwood’s Latest, ‘The Heart Goes Last’, Takes Us Back to Our Future Dystopia

True love ultimately endures in The Heart Goes Last, but so do the real terrors ever-present in Atwood's novels.

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Salvador Dalí’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’ Work Finally Gets Some Mad Love

This edition is valuable because it underscores a variety of connections that are generally not foregrounded in the work of either Lewis Carroll or Salvador Dalí.

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Salman Rushdie’s ‘Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights’ Can’t Tether the Muses

All the rowdy little devils from Persitan have settled down here, a bit, but Rushdie's mischievousness will not be tamed.

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Disco, AIDS and Nuclear War Permeate Jane Smiley’s ‘Early Warning’

Smiley doesn’t overlook defining political moments in part two of her trilogy, including the 1981 presidential election of Ronald Reagan and the ensuing sociopolitical shift rightward.

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‘A Little Life’ Is an Epic of the Intimate

We have all experienced joys and hardships, but through the lens of Jude's tortured existence, we truly are transported to an emotional landscape that is not our own.

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//Mixed media
//Blogs

Beyoncé and When Music Writing Becomes Activism

// Sound Affects

"The overall response to Beyoncé's "Formation" has been startlingly positive, but mostly for reasons attached to political agendas. It's time to investigate this trend.

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