Articles tagged essays, travel, memoirs, photography, criticism

‘Bar Yarns and Manic-Depressive Mixtapes’, or, Music criticism, Minnesota-style

Jim Walsh’s writing combines heartfelt personal stories with knowledgeable music criticism. Reading this collection feels like having a conversation with an old friend.

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‘The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2016’ Takes a Different Approach, This Year

When I learned that the content chosen for this anthology had been selected by high school students, I got nervous.

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The Absolution of Paul Theroux’s ‘Saint Jack’ in a World Lacking Irony

The narrative of Paul Theroux's (and later Peter Bogdanovich's) Saint Jack offers a palliative to the high-priced hedonism taking place in an American-owned compound in Singapore.

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Diane Arbus: “Happiness Perplexed Her”

Arthur Lubow is a meticulous researcher whose writing on Diane Arbus never devolves into the prurient or pedantic.

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‘Doctor Who’ and the Constraints of the American Cultural Cold War

Decolonization, shifting demographics and the rise of the US needed to be understood and processed through the British popular imagination. The Doctor landed his TARDIS just in time to help.

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‘Last Night, a Superhero Saved My Life’ Is Grounded in Reality

Recommended reading for those whose lives were saved in the nick of time, and were transformed into their better selves, thanks to Amazons, Caped Crusaders, and Mutants.

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The Warhol Paradox and ‘On&By Andy Warhol’

Andy Warhol seemed to always have it both ways. He was able to play high against low, simple against complex, present and yet far away, sexual/asexual, etc.

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‘The Age of Lovecraft’ Wonderfully Elucidates the Central Dilemma Posed by Lovecraft

The Age of Lovecraft asks readers to weigh his undeniable revulsion toward non-white, non-male bodies against his vision of a cosmos indifferent to all humans.

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‘Bukowski In a Sundress’ Is a Book You Should Judge By Its Cover

Kim Addonzio's memoir in essay ain't no summer beach read. Be very happy.

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Doctor Who: “Seeing patterns in things that aren’t there”

How a '90s Doctor Who might have been uniquely Doctor Who while differing greatly from what it actually ended up becoming.

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Instant Photography Before the Digital Era

The Polaroid cameras brought instant gratification to photography long before the digital era.

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On Saul Bellow’s Artful Two-mindedness

There may be simply too much to think about, but Saul Bellow certainly made a valiant effort over the course of his long career.

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What Fills the Empty Spaces in ‘City Squares’?

Squares are the empty hearts of cities waiting to be filled by individual and public meaning.

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Kathryn Harrison and the Relative Safely of Middle Age

Kathryn Harrison's middle-aged transgressions in True Crimes are less egregious than those of youth. And that's a good thing.

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Personal Morality, Not Political Ideology: ‘Doctor Who’ and the Cold War

How does a 2,000-year-old (give or take a few centuries) Gallifreyan Time Lord engage with the very human politics of mid-20th century class war?

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Tolstoy, Rasputin, and Teffi, One of Russia’s Greatest Woman Writers

Teffi’s genius lies in applying a light, ironic and at times satirical flair of humour to deeply serious subjects

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‘Avedon / Warhol’ Is an Astute Juxtaposition of the Two Brightest Stars in the Gagosian Galaxy

Gagosian has a clear-eyed, bird’s eye view on perhaps the most self-evident yet severely complicated relationship in modern art history.

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Charles Bukowski’s ‘On Love’ and ‘On Cats’

Bukowski's voice and style swung wildly over his lifetime, and collections varied considerably in quality depending on the whims of editors

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Was Frederick Douglass America’s First Media-savvy Political Activist?

The Lives of Frederick Douglass and Picturing Frederick Douglass reveal a radical approach to discussing politics, race and self.

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‘Keith Richards: A Life in Pictures’ Makes Addictive Eye Contact With the Living Legend

A lot of rock stars are hard to look at, either because when one gets up close you can see they've got simply too much crazy-eye, or dead-eye, or entitled-eye.

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Searching for Wholesome Online Fun: LDS Gamers

// Moving Pixels

"While being skeptical about the Church ever officially endorsing video games, LDS gamers remains hopeful about the future, knowing that Mormon society is slowly growing to appreciate gaming.

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