Articles tagged fiction

Spinsterhood and Its Discontents in Daniel Sada’s ‘One Out of Two’

A bewitching story about sisterhood, spinsterhood, and identity by a celebrated Mexican writer.

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The City as Autobiography in Darryl Pinckney’s Black Deutschland

Leaping from one fragmented city to the next, Pinckney’s narrator uses history to simultaneously define and obscure himself.

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How Does a Feminist Deal With a Cheating Husband?

Couple Mechanics is a suspenseful, moving drama about marriage, resilience, and the misogyny of faux feminist men.

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In the Excellent ‘Sweetgirl’, Home Is Just Another Storm

Sweetgirl wonders about home, and about what happens when you're born into the wrong one.

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Mona Awad’s Anti-Hero Lizzie Exists in a World of Mirrors

In 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl, Lizzie confronts two sides of seeing -- how she sees herself, and how others see her -- and how neither gets it right.

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The Empty Apocalypse of Style

Muslim's short story collection, Age of Blight, is conceptually interesting but stylistically and thematically shallow.

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In Brodsky’s ‘The Immortals’, Greek Mythology Is a Sculptural Tool (Sponsored Article)

Like the surreal, dreamlike romance of Jean Cocteau’s Orpheus, the immortals of Brodsky’s world wander throughout cities, caught between their ethereal origins and the gritty realism of their oneiric existence.

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Coming-of-Age Within the Exquisite Eccentricities of Europe

A precisely refined blend of unique and hypnotic people, places, and philosophical phrasings make Bret Easton Ellis and the Other Dogs wondrously impactful and artistic.

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‘The Dressmaker’s War’ Is a Tangled Mess of Threads

Mary Chamberlain's skilled seamstress finds herself in an impossibly snarled plot.

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‘The Autobiography of James T. Kirk’: Backstories for Everyone!

Filled with in-jokes and subtle references to the show, uber-fans will love this "auto" biography of Star Trek's Captain Kirk and the stories of the people in his life.

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‘Like Family’ Unfortunately, Is a Story as Lifeless as Its Central Subject

Like Family is full of worthwhile scattered sentiments, but there isn’t enough appeal or momentum between them to make enduring the entire work worthwhile.

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Justin Richards Delivers a Mixed Bag in Doctor Who: The Time Lord Letters

This is a thick and glossy volume featuring the Doctor's correspondence across time and space.

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‘Food Whore’ Critiques the City of Dining and Deceit

Jessica Tom captures the psychology of NYC’s elite dining scene in her aspiring debut.

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A Master Storyteller Is Revealed in ‘A Manual for Cleaning Women’

Lucia Berlin paints portraits of environments and people with an attentive, sympathetic and often cinematic eye.

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Charles Beaumont’s Life-Affirming Nature

Perchance to Dream, a recent collection of Charles Beaumont's short stories, is perhaps the most endearing account of his writing in decades.

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Time Keeps on Slipping Into the Future: Jane Smiley’s ‘Golden Age’

Completing Smiley's final installment of The Last Hundred Years Trilogy, we feel the peculiar sadness of missing people who don’t actually exist, and must resist the impulse to wave goodbye.

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Bruce Bauman’s Latest Is a Family Drama of Biblical Proportions

Broken Sleep is brimming with colorful characters, fascinating dialogue, and beautiful yet tragic relationships, making it easy to read and hard to forget.

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The Greater Implications of One Small Act in Ron Rash’s ‘Above the Waterfall’

If Ron Rash is, as he has been described, a "writer's writer" then Above the Waterfall might best be described as a "poet's novel", a book as enjoyable in its language as its story.

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Chuck Wendig’s ‘Zeroes’ Is a Paranoid Techno-thriller That’s Just Right for our Times

It's all too easy to see the ways that the Zeroes' security is constantly compromised, and realize that those are very natural extensions of the technology that surrounds us today.

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15 Oct 2015 // 7:30 AM

Rebel Hell

In The Rebel's Sketchbook, Rupert Dreyfus writes with the darkly absurd humour of a thirsty and somewhat paranoid Jonathan Swift.

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'SUPERHOTLine Miami' Is Exactly What It Sounds Like

// Moving Pixels

"SUPERHOTLine Miami provides a perfect case study in how slow-motion affects the pace and tone of a game.

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