Articles tagged graphic fiction

Jiro Taniguchi’s ‘Furari’ Will Enchant You

The maximalist minimalism of Jiro Taniguchi's work is on full display in this gentle, rewarding work.

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Comics Scholarship Finds Its Voice With ‘INKS’ and ‘Drawing the Line’

From Ohio State (a hotbed for comics studies) comes INKS and Drawing the Line, books for both academics and fans of comics alike.

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Exploring Sacred Space with Jesse Jacob’s ‘Crawl Space’

Evocative of Edwin Abbott’s Flatland, Jacobs takes on environmental destruction, the desecration of the sacred, and the arrogance and selfishness that plague our politics and our world.

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Dave Chisholm’s Wildly Imaginative Audio/visual Experience, ‘Instrumental’

An allegorical exploration of the idea of just how far some musicians will go to “make it”, Instrumental takes things to the extreme.

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Does Mariko Tamaki Think in a Gothic Font?

Mariko Tamaki’s words exist in an in-between state, neither entirely physical nor entirely a free-floating consciousness.

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‘Was She Pretty?’ Depicts a Litany of Ex-lovers

Was She Pretty? may suggest that anxieties over exes are universal, it also subtlety critiques its circle of privileged sufferers.

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‘Boundless’ Captures the Alienating Effects of Media Consumption

Explorations of consumer alienation by an emerging master of graphic storytelling.

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The Obscure Cities Series Blends the Subtle and the Fantastic

The steampunk cityscapes are fantastic in The Theory of the Grain of Sand, yet the underlying mystery is subtle.

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Hans Christian Andersen Would Be Delighted With Sanna Annukka’s Illustrations

Annukka enhances the reading experience of The Snow Queen and The Fir Tree with her distinctive artistic approach.

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Shirley Jackson’s ‘The Lottery’ Is No Less Shocking in This Graphic Adaptation

Miles Hyman implicitly connects Jackson's stoning ritual and the reaping of grain; illuminating, perhaps, the interconnection of life and death in both.

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Barbara Yelin’s ‘Irmina’ Makes Clear: There’s a High Cost to Ignoring One’s Political Climate

The provocative and visually stunning Irmina explores Nazi-era questions of culpability that resonate eerily with today's world.

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‘Planetes’ Should Be Required Baggage on the First Mission to Mars

This space drama aboard a garbage collection ship makes for first-rate sci-fi.

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‘Horses, Horses, In the End the Light Remains Pure’

Hideo Furukawa’s journey into Fukushima, post 3/11, is a journey into overlapping, concentric circles.

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Mary Wept Over the Feet of Jesus by Chester Brown

Comics artist Chester Brown makes a provocative argument that Jesus’ underlying message was anti-authoritarian, pro-woman, and pro-sex work.

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The Compulsive Artist: An Interview With Julie Doucet

Julie Doucet is still often associated with her award-winning comics work of the ‘90s. As Carpet Sweeper Tales demonstrates, however, she’s been doing a lot more since moving on from comics.

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There’s Something Oddly Comforting in Chris Oliveros’ Futile Tale

The Envelope Manufacturer is a light parable on the ravages of neoliberal capitalism.

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In ‘Killing and Dying’, Drama Is Hidden Between the Lines of Profile Art and Dialogue

Adrian Tomine's latest collection offers poignant, bittersweet and surprisingly filling snapshots of everyday life.

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What Should One Make of Childlike Comics Depicting the Exploits of an Erotic Dancer?

Canada's first autobiographical comic chronicles the drama of a stripper's life in a lighthearted and welcoming way.

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Of Maus and Men: Postwar Identity Through a Postmodern Lens in Art Spiegelman’s ‘Maus’

Far more than a comic book with an edge, Maus interrogates the fallacious identity politics of the Nazis, to an unforgettable effect. Given recent events in Europe, this is a vital book to revisit.

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Sunny Side Down by Lev Yilmaz

Image existentialists collaborating about the birth of a cartoonist, his adolescence, and his fruitless journey to rationalize his mediocre life.

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//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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