Articles tagged history

The “Good Old Days” of TV Are Happening Right Now

Why American television is better now than it's ever been -- and the unexpected paths by which it got there.

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‘Land of Mine’ Explores the Intolerable Costs of Nationalistic Vengeance

Land of Mine is perhaps the most powerful denunciation of nationalism's destructive force as we'll see on movie screens in 2017.

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‘Aleksandr Sokurov: Russian Ark’ Serves as a Succinct Companion to the Landmark Film

At once a production history, a film analysis and a history of the Hermitage Museum, the Chair of the Film Studies at Aberystwyth University has written a concise and thought-provoking volume.

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Caravaggio May Be the Least Documented Yet Most Constructed Renaissance Artist

Caravaggio and the Creation of Modernity draws attention to both the skill of the historian and the enduring and towering genius of the artist.

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‘Oklahoma City’ Shows That Timothy McVeigh’s Terrorism Has Contemporary Reach

Oklahoma City documents the complex events and individuals that lead to America's largest domestic terrorist attack.

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‘Dark Money’ Shines Light on the Billionaires Waging Secret War on Democracy

Jane Mayer’s riveting and frightening book tells how wealthy conservatives spent decades building an alternate universe of think tanks and owned politicians to make their dreams reality.

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‘Sounds of the Underground’, Excavated

Stephen Graham manages to distil the essence of underground and fringe music into identifiable and recognizable components of a larger, global movement.

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To Be Iranian Is to Be in a State of Perpetual Motion and Discovery

Hamid Dabashi's Iran Without Borders is a paean to the alternate ways in which the “real” Iran has been depicted since the 19th century.

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Nato Thompson’s Culture as Weapon’ in the Shadow of a Political Spectacle

Nato Thompson reminds us that battles are fought not just over culture, but with it.

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Black and White and Katrina All Over: Jazz Religion, the Second Line, and Black New Orleans

One of the best things about this updated edition of Jazz Religion, the Second Line, and Black New Orleans is that it looks at what’s to come just as much as it looks at bygones.

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The Mystery of the Medieval ‘Voynich’ Manuscript Still Holds the Power to Fascinate

From the court of the 17th century Holy Roman Empire to the National Security Agency, The Voynich Manuscript has been scrutinized but not yet deciphered.

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What Next, Frozen French Fries? ‘The Founder’ and McDonald’s Origin Story

For this surprisingly hard-edged biopic on the businessman behind McDonald's, Michael Keaton unfurls the black flag of unrepentant capitalism.

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Transience Permeates the Introspective Pages in ‘Turkey Rediscovered’

Where Job scraped his sores, where Xenophon crossed the Euphrates, Krause Reichert links the stories he knows well to their terrain and traces.

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BFI’s Release of Abel Gance’s ‘Napoléon’ Does Justice to a Masterpiece

The BFI’s restoration of Gance’s groundbreaking, grandiloquent 1927 epic is one of the year’s most highly anticipated Blu-ray releases.

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In Martin Scorsese’s ‘Silence’, Is God Even Listening?

Hunted Jesuit missionaries in 17th-century Japan wrestle with the possibility that all their suffering, and that of their persecuted followers, could be meaningless.

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‘Patriots Day’ Is Heavy With Exasperating Fiction

Tommy (Mark Wahlberg) embodies a troubling fiction, the one where one man can "fix it". Sometimes, that fiction is inspiring. Sometimes, it's exasperating.

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Trumpaholism, or, Is “Liquor Before Beer, Never Fear” a Piece of Fake News?

How I worry when I drink, and why Distilled Knowledge is diffuse knowledge.

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Michael Chabon’s ‘Moonglow’ Is a Big, Fat (Fun), Lie

Chabon merges his earlier and more recent literary profiles in a vivid, at times explosively entertaining, and occasionally schizophrenic novel about history, memory, and family.

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Private Goes Public in Miklós Janscó‘s ‘Private Vices, Public Virtues’

With this highly contentious erotic drama, Miklós Janscó fashions a most insular story of sexual freedom with an impenitent degree of self-indulgence.

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‘Television: A Biography’ Showcases How TV Is an Insanely Mutative Beast

David Thomson's lucrative and exhaustive biography of television reminds us that the continuously morphing state of TV matches our increasingly digitally-enhanced society.

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'Fire Emblem Heroes' Is a Bad Crossover

// Moving Pixels

"Fire Emblem Heroes desperately and shamelessly wants to monetize our love for these characters, yet it has no idea why we came to love them in the first place.

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