Articles tagged humor

4 Oct 2017 // 3:00 AM

The Golden Age of TV Dramas, From Most to Least Trumpy

Characters like Breaking Bad's lucky ‘ol Walt get to live out every Trump-ish dream while the rest of us can only watch.

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‘Stephen Colbert’s Midnight Confessions’ Runs Hot in the Show, Cold in the Book

Reading Colbert's Midnight Confessions cover to cover is a little like watching Peter Pan’s shadow run around the room -- you can't nail it down.

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Percival Everett’s Latest Is a Muted, Sober Rendering of What Seems to Be a Cliché

So Much Blue is a controlled novel of interwoven timelines about an artist coming to terms with the secrets he's kept from others.

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The Relentlessly Hopeful Comedy of ‘The Last Leg’

Political comedy is necessary these days. But hope is even more so. Thankfully, The Last Leg provides both.

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Books Like Chuck Klosterman’s ‘X’ May Represent a New Kind of History Lesson

Pop cultural savant Chuck Klosterman’s X collects his many disparate musings on all things otherwise inconsequential and in so doing creates a pop culture roadmap.

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The Thoughtful Absurdity of ‘Spaceplan’

Spaceplan is a goofy game that still manages to pack a potent emotional punch.

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David Sedaris’ ‘Theft By Finding’, Truth or Elaboration, Matters Not

David Sedaris' decades-spanning collection of his diary entries reveals the growth of one of America's most beloved humorists.

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‘Twin Peaks’: Flame Wars, Walk With Me

On 22 May, Twin Peaks returns; unfortunately, so does everything else that surrounds any significant pop culture text. This is how it will go.

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Laughing Through the Pain With Kamau Bell

Why The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell is the book we need to get through these times we don’t want to be in.

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‘Til Death Do You Part: And Other Thoughts About Family

Annabelle Gurwitch's humorous memoir, Wherever You Go, There They Are, captures how one is forever in the thralls of the family -- no matter the form that family takes.

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Can We Say the F Word Yet? On Fascism and Humor

In light of the decrees and executive orders signed thus far by Donald Trump, we might reasonably ask: is fascism relevant to America's current political state?

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Can You Believe It?: The ‘No Such Thing As a Fish’ Podcast

The researchers behind BBC's QI emerge from behind the scenes to inform, entertain and tease via their award-winning podcast, No Such Thing As a Fish.

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Vulgarians 101: A Course for Future Leaders of America

A dystopian syllabus for an inevitable future at a hypothetical university.

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How to Study Kafka in East Berlin Without Really Trying

A review of Schadenfreude, a Love Story, including some personal observations and self-identification that connect to a memoir with a really long title and lots of German words

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‘Get Out’ Is a Fantastic Freak-Out

Jordan Peele's new movie mixes humor, horror, and satire to create vital social commentary.

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Dave Barry Does the Unimaginable in an Exploration of the Sunshine State

Tired of fielding questions about what's the matter with Florida, a treasured American humorist takes matters into his own hands and finds out for himself.

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2 Feb 2017 // 10:00 AM

America Needs Willy Wonka Now More Than Ever

Gene Wilder's Willy Wonka embodies all the qualities America seeks in a leader these days.

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On Speaking to Southerners About Southerners

The Liberal Redneck Manifesto is poised to really put a dent in this mess that landed that creepy moneybag in the White House.

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Our Lives Are Guided By Addiction

Gregor Hens’ new non-fiction work, Nicotine, is an exploration of one particular niche in the addiction dialogue.

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Luigi Pirandello on Film: L’Umorismo and Confronting the Other of the Self

The Film Forum hosts seven films based on the writing of Luigi Pirandello that illustrate the complex ironies of the fractured Self.

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More Recent Articles
//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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