Articles tagged literature

‘The Noise of Time’ Considers the Artist’s Place in an Oppressive State

In this fictional account of composer Dmitri Shostakovich, Barnes reveals the inner conflicts of a man trying to live by a set of principles in a shfting time and place.

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‘Til Human Faces Wake Us: Don DeLillo’s ‘Zero K’

For all that it is cold and disquieting, DeLillo's latest is also his most sincere -- his most human -- meditation on death yet.

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The British Library’s Delightful Anthologies of Cats and Dogs in Literature

These charming books include some of the most famous (and infamous) dogs and cats known in literature, along with some lesser known tales and poems.

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To Read ‘Charlotte Brontë: A Fiery Heart’ Is to Fully Inhabit Haworth Parsonage

Claire Harman's biography of Charlotte Bronte sheds new light on a woman too often confounded with her beloved heroine.

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‘Guapa’ Is Much More Than Simply a ‘Gay’ Novel

Haddad makes a single day swell to encompass the powerful struggle to define one's own self and to come to terms with the consequences of autonomy.

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Kurt Vonnegut: Our Reluctant, Agnostic, Hippy Guru

Vonnegut's timeless stories challenge the assumptions, institutions, and ideologies that so delimit critical thinking and open-mindedness.

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‘Grief Is the Thing With Feathers’ Pokes Around in Poetry’s Carcass

In his first book, Max Porter pulls disparate voices and bangs them together to make something beautiful and scary.

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‘Sleep of the Righteous’ Underlines Why Hilbig Had Won Almost Every German Literary Prize

Life within East Germany is exposed in all its repressive, absurd horror in a recently translated collection of short stories by Wolfgang Hilbig.

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On Writing the Hidden History of American Women’s Lives

Sonja Livingston uses poetic essays to breathe life into some of America’s most remarkable, and little known, women.

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On the Meaningful Nonsense in ‘Jottings From a Far Away Place’

Formally inventive, beautifully written and thematically dense, Brendan Connell's latest collection is a multi-layered anthology that compels multiple readings.

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Almost Everything Is Open to Interpretation in Quentin S. Crisp’s ‘Blue on Blue’

Blue on Blue is a delightful kaleidoscope of ponderings, musings, and mysteries.

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If Chaucer Were Alive Today, He’d Be on the Front Page of ‘US Weekly’

Scholar Paul Strohm examines a particularly tumultuous year in the life of Geoffrey Chaucer.

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Romance and Rebellion in the Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley

Charlotte Gordon's dual biography of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley is an engaging read, but it's hampered by pedestrian writing and a too reverent perspective of its protagonists.

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‘Imaginary Cities’ Is a Book to Enjoy Getting Lost In

In charting the cities of human fancy, Darran Anderson has created the opposite of an atlas.

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‘The Meaning of the Library’ Goes Beyond Mere Bricks and Mortar

Despite their apparent tidiness, libraries are also formidably entropic spaces, messy jungles, with their own undergrounds.

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16 Jul 2015 // 10:00 AM

Atticus Finch a Racist? There Goes the Ideal

Fifty-three years later, for many fans of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book and perhaps even more so the Oscar-winning movie, Atticus is still the focus.

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9 Jul 2015 // 2:30 PM

For Harper Lee, ‘Mockingbird’ Fans, the Wait Is Almost Over

It’s the biggest literary surprise of the 21st century: On July 13, 55 years after the publication of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” the reclusive 89-year-old Harper

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‘Exile on Kalamazoo Street’ Echoes in Literature Form the Genius of Theatre

Exile on Kalamazoo Street is one of those stories that you come across every once in a while that fills you with a genuine sense of warmth.

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The Power of the Reader in ‘A History of Reading’

Alberto Manguel takes a thematic rather than linear approach to a history of reading, offering an entertaining and impassioned account of reading practices and readers' agency.

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Haruki Murakami’s Characters Grapple With Friendship and Aging, But His Stories Never Grow Old

Stapled onto an ephemeral present shaped by Lexus cars, Twitter, and transformational training, Murakami engages with timeless themes in his latest colourful tale.

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//Mixed media
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'Overwatch' and Anger Issues

// Moving Pixels

"I get angry in Overwatch not because I hate to lose, but because most of the time when I do lose, I can see so clearly how the loss could have been avoided.

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