Articles tagged manhattan, new york, vaudeville, automats, history

‘Dunkirk’: “The Bodies Come Back”

Dunkirk turns war movie tropes inside out to articulate a broader theme, not only the truism that war is excruciating, but more profoundly, that war is always the same, that it repeats, that it cannot be won.

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When American Women’s Dreams of Equality Carried Them to Russia

By uncovering lost stories of women living abroad, Julia Mickenberg revives rich histories of adventure.

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‘Dunkirk’ Is a Masterpiece of Overwhelming Realism

As uplifting as it is unrelenting, Christopher Nolan’s epic war thriller unites everyone in the most basic of objectives: survive to fight another day.

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‘Dunkirk’ Is a Compelling, Paralyzing, Nightmarish Vision of War

Christopher Nolan delivers his most cinematic work yet, assaulting the senses while examining courage and cowardice in wartime.

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Goran Therborn’s Scholary Study, ‘Cities of Power’ and the Global Moment

"Capital cities are by definition sites of political power... they are open also sites of resistance, of political counter-power, of protest rallies and headquarters of opposition movements, parties and trade unions."

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‘Three Stones Make a Wall’, an Introduction to Archaeology, Struggles Against Its Genre Boundaries

The blur that this book will "engage all readers no matter what their background", I'm afraid, I find myself constrained to differ.

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What Can Women do? Pretty Much Anything: ‘Wonder Women’

"We have to get the stories of these women out into the world. Because representation matters."

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‘Apollo in the Age of Aquarius’: Bringing the Space Race Back Down to Earth

Looking at NASA's interactions with the social movements of the '60s offers a new perspective on that landmark era in America.

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China Mieville’s ‘October’: The Bolsheviks Are Back in Vogue

What was the secret of the Russian Revolution? What lessons -- both positive and negative -- does it hold for the present day?

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Award-winning Cinematography Enriches François Ozon’s ‘Frantz’

Impressive camerawork draws viewers close to characters whose lives have been turned upside down by World War I.

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Summer Turns to Fall: Revisiting the ‘Summer of Love’ 50 Years Later

Summer of Love simultaneously demonstrates why that moment in the cultural timeline is worth commemorating, what its legacy is, and what was lost as summer turned to fall.

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On Norman Mailer, Jack Henry Abbott, and the Legacy of Going Too Deep Into the Belly of the Beast

How Norman Mailer, while preparing 1979's The Executioner's Song, collaborated with Jack Henry Abbott and opened doors that should have remained shut.

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Alexander Theroux’s ‘Einstein’s Beets’ Is an Acquired Taste

Einstein's Beets digs up animal and spiritual drives that lure us to gorge and stir us to gag.

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Never Forget: Angela Sarafyan On ‘The Promise’ and The Armenian Genocide

Best known for her memorable work on Westworld, Sarafyan discusses her new film, The Promise, an epic memorial to the Armenian Genocide.

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Romance and Genocide Don’t Mix in ‘The Promise’

One can argue about director Terry George's decision to focus on love in this milieu, but there’s no denying his execution fails on both a thematic and a narrative level.

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Istanbul: From Emperors to Street Vendors

Historian Thomas F. Madden's Istanbul leaves one with a sense of awe for how much of the human experience is on display in this one city, in this part of the world.

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It Takes a Village to Put a Man on the Moon: An Interview With the Creator’s of ‘Mission Control’

Director David Fairhead and Executive Producer Keith Haviland of Mission Control marvel at the men behind the first man on the moon.

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Idealism to Mass Murder in ‘The Road to Jonestown’

The author of Manson tracks how Jim Jones’ tragic magnetism and promises of racial solidarity and socialist utopia pulled hundreds of people into his fatal orbit.

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The Story of Hemingway and Dos Passos Is as Exciting as Any of Their Novels

The Ambulance Drivers tells of how Hemingway would use literature to seize the world and Dos Passos would use literature to change it.

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‘Electri_City’ Is Missing the Spark

It took a lot of work in the '70s to make music that sounded like it was created entirely by robots. The same could be said for Electri_City.

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How a Song By Unknown Newcomer Adam Johnston Ended Up on Blondie's New Album

// Sound Affects

"Adam Johnston of An Unkindness wrote a song at 17 years old and posted it online. Two years later, magic happened.

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