Articles tagged mark herman, john boyne, boy in the striped pajamas, holocaust, world war ii

An Epoch of Annihilation Whose Consequences Still Reverberate

In Fire and Blood, Historian Enzo Traverso sets his sights on two concepts: the facile equation of totalitarianisms, and the equally facile belief in the inevitability of historical progress.

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Showa Epic of Japan Concludes the Story of a Man and His Nation

Past and present converge in Mizuki’s conceptually rich manga.

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Mizuki’s ‘Hitler’ Offers Powerful Lessons for the Present

Depicting Hitler as a man, not a monster, forces us to realize the horrors of militarism and the ease with which history could repeat itself.

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What Is the Real Story of the Atomic Bombings?

America claimed the atomic bomb ended World War II and saved American lives. Journalist and historian Paul Ham calls that “a pack of lies”.

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‘Thank Your Lucky Stars’ These Old Hollywood A-Listers Don’t Usually Sing

This featherweight, all-star WWII fundraiser looks great in its new Blu-ray edition.

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‘The Bridge’ Shows a Forgotten Side of Nazi Germany’s Final Days

The Bridge, which tells the story of the Volkssturm in the final days of the Nazi party, is classic work of art.

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‘A God in Ruins’ Perpetuates the Deep Sadness in Atkinson’s Writing

Kate Atkinson's characters, from private investigator Jackson Brodie to Teddy Todd, are often lonely people with surprising secrets.

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‘Judgment at Nuremberg’ Shows the Cost of Not Caring

Judgement at Nuremberg is a reminder that the courtroom drama is Hollywood’s most underrated and underused genre.

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‘Alan Turing: The Enigma’ Is Surprisingly Spiritual in Its Epiphanies

People who read Alan Turing: The Enigma after watching The Imitation Game will feel let down by the film. The epiphanies in the book are remarkable.

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‘The Decent One’ Takes on the Task of Humanizing Himmler

Using Heinrich Himmler's personal letters and journals, The Decent One presents an intimate family portrait of the architect of the Holocaust.

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Cannes 2015: ‘Saul Fia’, ‘Mon Roi’, and the Politics of Award-Giving

Whereas Son of Saul represents the advancement of cinematic language, Mon Roi encapsulates the politics of selection and award-giving at Cannes.

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Cannes 2015: Laszlo Nemes’ Distinctly Visceral Take on the Holocaust Gets Audiences Talking

Son of Saul, a movie from Hungarian filmmaker Laszlo Nemes, has become the consensus Cannes breakout.

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Jean Pierre Melville’s ‘La silence de la mer’ Is the French Resistance in Microcosm

Austere even by Jean-Pierre Melville's later standards, La silence de la mer is a powerful testament to nonviolent resistance.

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War Changes People, Though Not Necessarily for the Better

Predating Suite Française in time and tone The Fires of Autumn is an amazingly prescient look at war and greed.

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By Confusing Religion With Reality, ‘Little Boy’ Fails Its Faith-Based Foundation

Because it is unsure whether it wants to push the Bible or a little boy's wavering faith, Little Boy ends up giving us neither.

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‘Ravensbrück’: The Nonfiction of Nightmares

Sarah Helm’s Ravensbrück is a searingly comprehensive look at the sole concentration camp built to house women. It is the nonfiction of nightmares.

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‘The Imitation Game’ Is Equally About Wartime and Emotional Codes

This biopic both reminds the world of Alan Turing’s genius and aims to empower “those people no one expects anything from who do the things no one expects.”

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Of Maus and Men: Postwar Identity Through a Postmodern Lens in Art Spiegelman’s ‘Maus’

Far more than a comic book with an edge, Maus interrogates the fallacious identity politics of the Nazis, to an unforgettable effect. Given recent events in Europe, this is a vital book to revisit.

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These Protestant Communities Understood Persecution Firsthand, and the Nazi Agenda Horrified Them

The remote mountain villages of le Chambon and the Plateau Vivarais-Lignon were Protestant havens that opened their homes to shelter countless Jewish children during WWII.

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‘The Temptation of Despair’ Is a Marvelous New Work on World War II-Era Germany

Werner Sollors' memories formed the basis for this book, but his research caused him to re-evaluate and re-imagine what he thought he knew about the time and the era.

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Cage the Elephant Ignite Central Park with Kickoff for Summerstage Season

// Notes from the Road

"Cage the Elephant rocked two sold-out nights at Summerstage and return to NYC for a free show May 29th. Info on that and a preview of the full Summerstage schedule is here.

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