Articles tagged marshall mcluhan, jane brox, history, electricity, thomas edison, nikola tesla, artificial light

‘Arithmetic’ Delightfully Yields Anything But Obvious Results

What looks like a simple topic becomes a surprising trip into unexpected worlds in Paul Lockhart's beautifully executed Arithmetic.

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Franz Hessel’s ’ Reprinted Walking in Berlin’ Celebrates the Observant Urban Stroller

Reading Walking in Berlin is the next best thing to traveling back in time to visit the capital of the Weimar Republic as it was in 1929.

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Whom to Love and Whom to Hate in War and Film? Interview With ‘Land of Mine’ Director and Cast

"I have always been drawn to the flip side of the coin. My other two movies are also about the demons, the hate, and the betrayal," says Martin Zandvliet.

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You May Be Black or You May Be White But in Africa You’re an American First

David Peterson del Mar explores a creation myth for a nation of black people still searching for personal and collective terra firma.

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‘Printer’s Error’ Is a Hilarious Romp Through Publishing History

Rare book specialists (and Pawn Stars consultants) J.P. and Rebecca Romney craft an amusing narrative full of spite, blood, and the world’s first (pre)internet troll.

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Lost Chords, Major Chords, Minor Chords, Dissonant Counter-melodies: ‘Dreaming the Beatles’

This biography of the Beatles illustrates how their personality dynamics served as both a necessary elixir and an addictive poison in the creation of their music.

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1 Aug 2017 // 2:30 AM

‘Dunkirk’ Is an Allegory of Resilience for Our Age

Christopher Nolan’s film is not primarily a patriotic tale of superior character, but rather a celebration simply of the universal ability to endure.

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Kathryn Bigelow’s Intense ‘Detroit’ Finds a Glimmer of Hope Amidst the Hopelessness

This is no one's neighborhood. Detroit doesn’t help anyone to feel at home, least of all viewers.

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‘Heretics!’ Illustrates the Contentiousness Surrounding Philosophy

Heretics! is an original and thoughtful book, sliding somewhere between academic text, layperson’s introduction, and popular philosophy, with a unique, illustrated, twist.

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‘Dunkirk’: “The Bodies Come Back”

Dunkirk turns war movie tropes inside out to articulate a broader theme, not only the truism that war is excruciating, but more profoundly, that war is always the same, that it repeats, that it cannot be won.

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When American Women’s Dreams of Equality Carried Them to Russia

By uncovering lost stories of women living abroad, Julia Mickenberg revives rich histories of adventure.

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‘Dunkirk’ Is a Masterpiece of Overwhelming Realism

As uplifting as it is unrelenting, Christopher Nolan’s epic war thriller unites everyone in the most basic of objectives: survive to fight another day.

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‘Dunkirk’ Is a Compelling, Paralyzing, Nightmarish Vision of War

Christopher Nolan delivers his most cinematic work yet, assaulting the senses while examining courage and cowardice in wartime.

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Goran Therborn’s Scholary Study, ‘Cities of Power’ and the Global Moment

"Capital cities are by definition sites of political power... they are open also sites of resistance, of political counter-power, of protest rallies and headquarters of opposition movements, parties and trade unions."

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‘Three Stones Make a Wall’, an Introduction to Archaeology, Struggles Against Its Genre Boundaries

The blur that this book will "engage all readers no matter what their background", I'm afraid, I find myself constrained to differ.

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What Can Women do? Pretty Much Anything: ‘Wonder Women’

"We have to get the stories of these women out into the world. Because representation matters."

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‘Apollo in the Age of Aquarius’: Bringing the Space Race Back Down to Earth

Looking at NASA's interactions with the social movements of the '60s offers a new perspective on that landmark era in America.

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China Mieville’s ‘October’: The Bolsheviks Are Back in Vogue

What was the secret of the Russian Revolution? What lessons -- both positive and negative -- does it hold for the present day?

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Award-winning Cinematography Enriches François Ozon’s ‘Frantz’

Impressive camerawork draws viewers close to characters whose lives have been turned upside down by World War I.

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Summer Turns to Fall: Revisiting the ‘Summer of Love’ 50 Years Later

Summer of Love simultaneously demonstrates why that moment in the cultural timeline is worth commemorating, what its legacy is, and what was lost as summer turned to fall.

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TIFF 2017: 'The Shape of Water'

// Notes from the Road

"The Shape of Water comes off as uninformed political correctness, which is more detrimental to its cause than it is progressive.

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