Articles tagged michael jackson, thriller, music, music videos, geeks, horror, zombies, shaun of the dead, scream

‘Supernatural’: “The Future” Starts Bleak, Then Meanders Into Rehashed Plots

A deeply disturbing opening and several bad plot devices inch us closer to the finalé.

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Visually Mesmerizing, ‘The Love Witch’ Could Use More Fire Power Behind Its Spell

Prescient feminist issues are brought together with problematic cinephilia to expand upon horror nostalgia.

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‘Saturday Night Fever’ Casts Disco-Ball Light into America’s Dark Corners

Much like All in the Family -- which also addressed sexuality, gender roles, and race in a brutally honest manner -- Saturday Night Fever uncovers ugly truths.

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Genre as the Flesh of the Human Experience: An Interview With Rod Blackhurst of ‘Here Alone’

Blackhurst reflects on his discovery of cinema, the need to rely on the conventions of cinema, and his ambitions to create a character study that will resonate.

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‘Supernatural’: “The Memory Remains” Retreads Some Familiar Territory

"The Memory Remains", with a few minor exceptions, borrows heavily from a season one classic.

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‘Free Fire’ Is Clever and Vigorous—Just Don’t Expect It to Be Smart

Ben Wheatley's latest is Reservoir Dogs meets Smokin’ Aces minus any and all narrative ambition.

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‘Stephen Stills’ Won’t Be Making an Appearance Tonight

This new biography of Stephen Stills is an entertaining and informative overview of one of rock's most durable legends -- even without Stills' input.

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‘Supernatural’: The Twisty “British Invasion” Is Confusing, Surprising, and Fun

Supernatural (finally) airs a must-see episode of genuinely surprising plot twists.

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Lyricists and Composers are ‘Links in a Chain’ in Absorbing ‘More Songwriters on Songwriting’

Paul Zollo's book is a satisfying sequel in which composers from Paul Simon to Sia, Elvis Costello to Loretta Lynn, discuss their creative processes.

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Arnold Schwarzenegger Has to Do Some Heavy Lifting in ‘Aftermath’

Aftermath strips away the action and relies solely on Schwarzenegger to carry the story.

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‘SHOT!’: A Photographic Tribute to Sex, Drugs, and Rock ‘n’ Roll

Barney Clay’s doc about legendary photographer Mick Rock is a must-see for fans of glam.

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Fifteen Years Later, ‘Donnie Darko’ Is Still Worth Enduring the Impenetrability

Richard Kelly's debut is as good as it permits itself to be, which is just short of masterful.

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Supernatural’s ‘Ladies Drink Free’ Is a Dull Pit Stop on the Road to the Finalé

The show comes back from a seasonal hiatus with a predictable monster-of-the-week episode, but at least it contains some hints for the future.

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Mainstream Darko: Director Richard Kelly on Building His Own Sandbox

Much as Donnie Darko claimed widespread fame by defying both convention and expectation, Kelly is fighting to bring the mainstream to him on his own terms.

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Love Is (Sort of) in the Air in ‘Mystery Science Theater 3000 Volume XXXVIII’

Can poverty or flaming meteors stop the course of true love? Sometimes.

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‘The Chamber’ Keeps the Drama and Suspense Going

The Chamber is the filmic equivalent of a fairground ride, the stimulation of emotion over ideas.

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‘Life’: Wait, Haven’t We Seen This Before?

Life disregards its genre predecessor, Alien to the detriment of the film.

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‘2Dark’ Is Not Too Dark

In 2Dark, a cartoon aesthetic quickly alters the gravity of what would otherwise be some very heavy subject matter.

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‘Song to Song’: Malick On Repeat

Terrence Malick retreads familiar motifs and themes in yet another nebulous navel-gazer.

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‘Song to Song’ Revels in the Chaos of the Austin Music Scene

With layered character development to accompany his typically arresting visuals, auteur Terrence Malick may have finally found a palatable balance between his visual and narrative poeticism.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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