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Articles tagged not enough time to read

Sunday, January 1 1995

Crossing Over with John Edward

it is certainly the first talk show to have as its guests, members of the dearly departed.


Charmed

As Charmed's Paige, Rose McGowan seems stifled and reticent, perhaps as if she's not quite sure what she's supposed to be doing -- and so, in her performances so far, she's just laid low, and made no waves or sudden movements.


Crossing Jordan / Philly

Here are two shows that lift their premises, plotlines, and even their personality quirks from tv past and present, fritter away the skills of good actors, and lock skilled writers and producers into tired formulae.


Charmed

In a nation where the man who will be president is afraid to say the word 'gay' on national television, it might come as a surprise that one of its biggest television stars is playing a gay man on television.


City of Angels

For all the primetime-melodramatic cliches at work in the men's conflicts -- the moral and political posturing, not to mention the dick-swinging -- it is significant that these battles are waged by black men, pitted against one another as they wrangle over the scant resources allotted them by a larger governing system.


Curb Your Enthusiasm

Larry David as Larry David seems very real, very whiny, very self-absorbed, and in the end, not someone who's much fun to hang out with.


Courage the Cowardly Dog

The fact is that all cartoons, from the surreal output of the Max Fleisher studios ('Betty Boop') and Disney's elitist morality fables ('Snow White and the Seven Dwarves') to Hanna-Barbera's execrable attempts at hipness ('Groovy Ghoulies'? 'Funky Phantom'?) and today's post-'Ren & Stimpy' moment of unrelenting gross-out humor ('Cow and Chicken', 'South Park'), are worthy of appraisal, if only because the medium itself is inherently subversive.


X-Men Legends II: Rise of Apocalypse

The character development contains about as much depth as a Playboy centerfold's bio sheet.


The Warriors

Rockstar Toronto didn't just remake a cult favorite to reap the commercial benefits; they expanded an interesting story into something that could only work in this medium.


Worms 4: Mayhem (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
We Love Katamari (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Viewtiful Joe: Double Trouble (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Urban Reign (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Ultimate Spider-Man (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
1213 (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Tokobot (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Trauma Center: Under the Knife (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
True Crime: New York City (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Tomb Raider: Legend (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Tomb Raider: Legend (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
SBK: Snowboard Kids DS (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Soulcalibur III (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Sid Meier’s Pirates! (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Sigma Star Saga (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Sly 3: Honor Among Thieves (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Still Life (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Shadow of the Colossus (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Super Monkey Ball Adventure (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Suikoden IV (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
The Suffering: Ties That Bind (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Samurai Champloo: Sidetracked (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Ratchet: Deadlocked (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Rise of the Kasai (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Rumble Roses XX (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Quake 4 (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
187 Ride or Die (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
NBA 2K6 (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Need for Speed: Most Wanted (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
New Super Mario Bros. (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Nintendogs (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
µcade (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Meteos (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
The Movies (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Mario Superstar Baseball (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Metroid Prime: Hunters (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Mario Kart DS (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Metal Gear Acid (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
The Matrix: Path of Neo (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
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