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Articles tagged not enough time to read

Sunday, January 1 1995

A Density of Souls by Christopher Rice

. . . by young writer Christopher Rice (progeny of gothic writer Anne Rice and poet and painter Stan Rice), is a mystery and gay-coming-of-age story that is powered, in part, by the current of hate pulsing through America.


The Dirt: Confessions of the World’s Most Notorious Rock Band by Motley Crue, with Neil Strauss

[Motley Crue's The Dirt] and its candid tales of porn stars, overdoses, and glam-metal makes the sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll memories of other bands seem almost as sweet and innocent as that book by Britney Spears and her mother.


Dark Universe by William F. Nolan

PULL.


Dogwalker by Arthur Bradford

Each story confronts us with a certain oddity or malformation, which is treated in such a childlike, open-eyed way that the narration renders these subjects almost absurdly normal.


Deadlock: The Inside Story of America’s Closest Election by David Von Drehle

It's flash history created by the instant-gratification culture of Internet analysis and sound-bite news. One fears that, to the general public, source is irrelevant, content is king. But there exists a subversive group of individuals who want to know how information was attained, the validity of the source, the bias of the reporter.


Dreamcatcher by Stephen King

This isn't going to be the book you'll hand to someone who's never read King before, but it may be one for the die-hard King fans, if only to see him make up for the alien-ridden debacle of 'Tommyknockers'.


Darkness Divided by John Shirley

Alternately disturbing, depressing, bleak, and painful, these stories are bound together by an acute observation of the shadows of the human soul, which makes them so powerful and compelling.


Destroy All Monsters by Ken Hollings

Expands upon this fusion of high and low culture, using mass-media tropes to elaborate on endlessly dense themes. The novel is most easily summarized as an 'alternative history,' a what-if scenario.


The Donald Richie Reader: 50 Years of Writing on Japan by Donald Richie (edited by Arturo Silva)

Throughout his work one point is central: the greatest contrast and point of confusion between the Japanese and Westerners lies in their respective concepts of the surface of things. While Westerners are wary to a fault, distrusting surfaces and ever obsessed with the true meaning behind them, the Japanese exist in an eternal 'now' that renders all of their expressions true.


A Cormac McCarthy Companion: The Border Trilogy by Edwin T. Arnold & Dianne C. Luce, eds.

In the 1990s, this community of McCarthy fans extended its territory into the world of the American academy with the establishment of something called, in this volume, 'McCarthy studies', practised by a weird enclave of literary critics and pop cultural historians who, judging by the essays here, are immersed in the intricacies of their intellectual obsession.


Crazy Rhythm by Leonard Garment (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Chum by Mark Spitzer (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Choke by Chuck Palahniuk (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
cool for you by Eileen Myles (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Borrowed Dress by Cathy Colman (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
BoyGenius by Yongsoo Park (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
The Body Artist by Don DeLillo (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Behind the Muse by Bill DeMain (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Beat Punks by Victor Bockris (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
The Beforelife by Franz Wright (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
PopMatters - Books - Reviews (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
After Dachau by Daniel Quinn (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
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