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Articles tagged not really scared

Sunday, January 1 1995

The Inflatable Butch: New Funny Stuff by Ellen Orleans

Each story winds up with some kind of larger-picture statement about lesbian life, yet it falls short because you just can't sum up something universal about lesbian life in a two-page quip.


I May Not Get There With You: The True Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dyson illuminates the complexities of King’s identity and challenges the boundaries in which King and his legacy have been forced to inhabit because of desires on the part of the King family, traditional Civil Rights leaders, and the mass media to neuter (pun, absolutely intended) his persona and his politics.


In Therapy We Trust: America’s Obsessions with Self-Fulfillment by Eva S. Moskowitz

I do not knock the importance of counseling for people with serious problems... [but] only a culture like ours can develop on-line therapeutic support systems and then diagnose Internet Addiction Disorder.


In the Box Called Pleasure by Kim Addonizio

Wild women, alcoholics, sluts, masochists, the lustful and the ravaged populate these stories with a vengeance -- not necessarily a political one, but a human one that demands that these realities be exposed and explored.


Here To Go: Brion Gysin by Terry Wilson and Brion Gysin

Gysin deserves much better treatment than relegation to a footnote in the history of the Beats, much more consideration than simply as a 'friend of Bill'.


Henderson’s Spear by Ronald Wright

These critiques, however, are as close as you can come to having too much of a good thing. 'Henderson's Spear' is a fascinating tale that teaches its readers small lessons about Polynesian life, the British royalty and the Korean war effortlessly without seeming overstuffed.


The Hero’s Walk by Anita Rau Badami

[Expatriate Indian] writers -- among others -- cannot write as 'South Asians' or about India without encountering controversies over authenticity that push and prod the author to define, albeit reluctantly, a national identity. Perhaps the only way to truly answer the question of identity is by refusing to answer at all, or answering only with the condition that the interrogator be thoroughly comfortable with hyphens.


The Holocaust’s Ghost: Writings on Art, Politics, Law and Education by F.C. DeCoste and Bernard Schw

After many generations of being inculcated with 'real' television and movie reels, we have found the Holocaust equivalent to less than fiction - a reified historical memory that frequently appears in our lives through various media outlets and forms, but little more.


Hell’s Kitchen by Chris Niles

Niles applies her brilliant one-liners to play havoc with are our pop-culture silliness.


Girl Beside Him by Cris Mazza (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
GoTo by Steve Lohr (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Fool’s Gold by Jane S. Smith (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Fixer Chao by Han Ong (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Fearless Jones by Walter Mosley (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Flash Fortune by Todd Hayes (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Empire Falls by Richard Russo (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Empire Falls by Richard Russo (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Dogwalker by Arthur Bradford (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
Dreamcatcher by Stephen King (Reviews) [1.Jan.95]
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