Articles tagged poetry

Marge Piercy and the Geography of Home

In topics ranging from poverty to war’s ravages to environmental collapse, Piercy obeys the poet’s dictum to act as witness with Made in Detroit.

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Maya Angelou Meets Funk and Hip-Hop in “On Aging” (audio) (Premiere)

You'd be hard-pressed to find a more creative way to celebrate the legacy of Maya Angelou than to put some slap bass behind her evocative spoken word poetry.

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David Yezzi’s Work in Fluency, Grace and Agility

The poet David Yezzi is considered by many critics to be one of the leading voices of his generation. His new book of poems is an impressive, beautifully laid-out collection, with something for everyone.

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Tough Guys Recite: The 5 Best Poetry Spittin’ TV Characters

Every generic hero on TV can finish a poetic quotation or identify a poignant quatrain (down to the line numbers). But few can spit Tennyson or Yeats with such venom as these guys.

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Evangelista: In Animal Tongue

In Animal Tongue is not for everyone, and will likely only find its audience among those who are willing to join the artist on her journey of cobbling disparate sounds and images together.

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Matana Roberts: COIN COIN Chapter One: Gens de Couleur Libres

Roberts gives eloquent voice to the fractured nature of identity, the way conflicting identifications jostle for prominence in our psyches, the multiple consciousness of modern hybridity.

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26 May 2011 // 9:00 PM

Nicholas Urie: My Garden

Like Bukowski, the gloomy laureate whose work is re-sounded here, Nichloas Urie is not afraid to walk on the dark side. He's also able to find fragments of beauty in the gloom.

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Gil Scott-Heron & Jamie xx: We’re New Here

The sly luxury of the xx's debut is present here, but it’s fortified by a full-bodied, slo-mo, nigh-on-backwards, skank.

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Deciphering the Jay-Z Code

He's got 99 problems but a book ain't one. Jay-Z's nonlinear memoir illuminates rap as personal narrative, lyric poetry, and transformative medium.

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Hip-Hop’s Laboratory of Language

What do William Wordsworth, Robert Frost, Ice Cube, and Ghostface Killah have in common? Finally, they all appear in anthologies.

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‘Howl: A Graphic Novel’ Wails Brilliantly Into the 21st Century

Eric Drooker expands his artistic interpretation of Allen Ginsberg's poem "Howl", as featured in Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman's feature film of the same name, resulting in an inspired graphic interpretation of the influential poem

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The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson by Jerome Charyn

Freely mixing fact with fiction, Jerome Charyn's Emily Dickinson lusts after a handyman while boarding at Holyoke, visits rum resorts with her huge dog Carlo, and still finds time to bake a great loaf of bread.

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The Ticking is the Bomb by Nick Flynn

Flynn’s obsessive nature may force his locomotive mind off the rails, but he dutifully and beautifully records what’s illuminated by the sparks.

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Nicholson Baker’s Enthusiasms and Passionate Obsessions

Nicholson Baker writes from his enthusiasms, which are many and ever changing. Among other things, his books have focused on sex, John Updike, public libraries, and pacifism and World War II. His latest, The Anthologist, is his love letter to poetry.

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30 Mar 2009 // 7:00 AM

Ours is a great era of translation. It has been going for at least two decades now, bringing fiction, drama, and especially poetry into English

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American Experience: Walt Whitman

Like its subject, Mark Zwonitzer's Walt Whitman is grand and particular.

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11 Feb 2008 // 8:59 PM

Proust Was a Neuroscientist by Jonah Lehrer

Did you know there was science in poetry?

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The Complete Poetry: A Bilingual Edition by César Vallejo

Today Vallejo, the bard of Peru, has a place among the finest of his century's poets.

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Bronx Biannual by Miles Marshall Lewis [Editor]

With his selection of stories and mix of old and young Bronx-based writers, Lewis is exposing the side of the BX that many are too blinded with stereotypes to see.

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The Maytrees by Annie Dillard

The image of an enormous sack stuffed with love and sagging from a hat rack is not one of Dillard’s finest moments.

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The Best and Worst Films of Spring 2015

// Short Ends and Leader

"January through April is a time typically made up of award season leftovers, pre-summer spectacle, and more than a few throwaways. Here are PopMatters' choices for the best and worst of the last four months.

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