Articles tagged political science, history, american politics, supreme court, anthologies, bush, obama, case law, diversity

Never Again, Until Next Time

David Rieff's exploratory work in In Praise of Forgetting seeks to map the ways in which historical memory acts upon us and can be acted upon.

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Howard Means’ ‘67 Shots’ Crucially Reminds Us That We Can’t Always Trust Those in Charge

Tension and painful memories still hang over Kent State, 46 years after the state-sanctioned murder of students, as does the warning it conveys.

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Yeshua Confronts His Daddy Issues in ‘Last Days in the Desert’

In between exchanges with the Devil, Yeshua comes in contact with other folks in the desert, people plainly provided to embody lessons for this troubled son.

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From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime: The Making of Mass Incarceration in America

In America today, "states like California and Michigan spend more money on imprisoning young people than on educating them." How did we let this happen?

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‘Ahmedabad’ Is Characterized by Uncertainty and Suspicion

Ahmedabad is not a history or even a thorough study, but an unassuming glimpse at the forces that have most profoundly shaped the modern landscape of the city.

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‘Éamon de Valera’: From Irish Rebel to Politician

This compact study of a man many worshiped and as many despised will serve readers wanting more facts, if less wit.

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‘Under the Big Black Sun’ Tells of an L.A. Before the Kids From Orange County Arrived

They had the neutron bomb, The Masque, and all the youthful energy you'd ever want to muster. What became of the early L.A. punks, then?

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‘Elvis & Nixon’ and Histories and Fates Captured in a Photo

Even as this film gets bogged down in jokes and speculations, it makes the point that performance is its own kind of truth.

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How the US Government Spins ‘The War on Leakers’

Lloyd C. Gardner makes an alarming case for the elusiveness of American democracy and the astounding ignorance in which it operates.

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1 Apr 2016 // 3:00 AM

The Banjo: America’s African Instrument

Laurent Dubois' biography of one of America’s iconic folk instruments spans continents and cultures. In this excerpt, we explore the banjo's humble origins.

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‘Small Town Talk’ Both Celebrates and Interrogates Woodstock’s Past

If you're looking for a true-to-life portrait of the way cultural memory evolves and is shaped within the context of a small town, this is a profound case study.

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The Paper Trail: An Unexpected History of a Revolutionary Invention

Paper created a world in which free thinking could flourish, and brought disciplines from science to music into a new age.

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The Brazen Age: New York City and the American Empire: Politics, Art, and Bohemia

In this excerpt of David Reid's rich and thorough history of New York City, 1945 -1950, we read of Albert Camus' first impression of the city as “a hideous, inhuman city" of "violent light".

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The Sensual Machine: ‘The Typewriter Revolution’

Richard Polt’s work is simply a confessional love letter to a most charming and pioneering creation.

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Waiting for Buddy Guy: Chicago Blues at the Crossroads

In the late '70s and early '80s, British blues fan Alan Harper became a transatlantic pilgrim to Chicago. He came to listen to the blues. This rich memoir captures not only the music, but the memories of many of Chicago's great blues legends and others who lived during this important era.

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‘Small Town Talk’ and the Rise and Fall of Woodstock

Small Town Talk offers an in-depth look at the rise and fall of not only the town of Woodstock, but also those who made an icon of '60s idealism.

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‘Heads’ Traverses the Intracranial Landscape of Minds Set Loose By Myriad Chemical Compounds

In his sprawling exploration of psychedelic America, Jarnow finds himself ensconced within the Deadhead camp, often to the disservice of other acid-forged scenes.

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An Epoch of Annihilation Whose Consequences Still Reverberate

In Fire and Blood, Historian Enzo Traverso sets his sights on two concepts: the facile equation of totalitarianisms, and the equally facile belief in the inevitability of historical progress.

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The American Story in 6.5 Hours: Criterion Restores Jan Troell’s Emigration Epic

Jan Troell's masterful double header looks like two films and plays like one as it takes the Nilsson family from 19th century Sweden to life in the new world.

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Is It Always Better to Think Things Through Twice?

Columnist Stanley Fish's collection of works has readers reconsidering how they form their opinions.

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Hitchcock's 'Suspicion', 'I Confess' and 'The Wrong Man' Return in Blu-ray

// Short Ends and Leader

"These three films on DVD from Warner Archives showcase different facets of Alfred Hitchcock's brilliance.

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