Articles tagged race

Ann Powers’ ‘Good Booty’ and the Connection Between Eroticism and Popular Music

This is how American music got its sexual groove on.

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Jazz, Cocktails, and the Overlooked Players of Film Noir

A noir protagonist usually finds himself encountering a new danger around each corner. A jazz musician, in venturing into the throes of an intricate composition, must also anticipate the unknown.

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‘Fences’ Finds the Beauty in Family Tragedy

Despite plodding direction, the resonant themes and rich performances of Denzel Washington and Viola Davis turn this stage play into a powerhouse melodrama.

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Caitlyn Jenner, Rachel Dolezal, and the Shifting Boundaries of Identity

Transracialism may and may not be as legitimate as transgenderism in the modern push for fluidity of identity categories.

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The Old Dominion in Song: Clipse and the Virginia Schism

Though the trappings may be different, the rhetoric layered beneath Lord Willin’ is a borrowed form of dubious justification that reeks of the Virginia slave system.

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20 Mar 2017 // 9:00 AM

Chuck Berry, O.G.

Chuck Berry was a black man who spent the majority of his career entertaining white audiences with music more deeply rooted in black culture than they ever thought to ponder.

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On Race and Meritocracy in Academia

Today's elite universities and students claim to value diversity. But do they really?

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‘Orange Is the New Black’ and Ethnic and Racial Differences Within the Latinx Community

One of the most important messages of this show is that race is not all encompassing, but rather, it intersects with gender, sexuality, class, religion, and region in diverse ways.

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A Letter From Your Lesbian Friend to Your Black Friend

Some reflections on the challenge of educating allies, with the help of Ben Passmore's Your Black Friend.

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Race Explored With Different Degrees of Emphasis: ‘Pioneers of African-American Cinema’

Encompassing documentaries, silent comedy, melodramas and religious films, this collection of early cinema made by American-American filmmakers is fascinating viewing.

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This Graphic Novel Adaptation of ‘Kindred’ Is Made Awkward With KLOKs! and CHOOMs!

If you’ve never read any of Octavia E. Butler's works, Kindred is a good place to start, but this version is a little too manga for such a serious work.

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Zadie Smith’s ‘Swing Time’ Does a Difficult Dance

Learning from the past is not as simple as pressing rewind: it's a dance that's quite difficult to execute.

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White on White: The Misappropriate Commercialization of a Mina Mazzini Song

A new TV ad for a Las Vegas hotel seems like campy fun. But the subtext isn't so innocent.

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Racializing Rock: The ‘60s and the White Sounds of ‘Pet Sounds’

Pet Sounds is not a racist text, but its impact was racist because it further encoded rock as a white genre, perpetuating the institutionalized prejudice that relegated African Americans to the margins of rock.

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Race Mixing in ‘Absalom’s Daughters’

This is not an attempt to rewrite Faulkner as much as it's a cogent effort at bringing women and people of color to the forefront of a Faulkner-inspired work.

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The Complicated Story of Race and Rock ‘n’ Roll in the ‘60s

In Just Around Midnight, Jack Hamilton explains what happened over the course of the '60s that turned rock 'n' roll white.

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There’s No Room for You in Hannah Tennant-Moore’s ‘Wreck and Order’

Our self-indulgent protagonist tries to find herself in the rural poverty of the third world but the people, the customs, the food, it all starts to grate on her first world sensibilities.

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‘Country Comes to Town’ Illuminates Nashville’s and Country Music’s Internal Struggles

A fascinating piece of analysis about Music City, USA, Jeremy Hill's book is a thoughtful and thorough urban scholarship on origins and authenticity, among other things.

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The Glow Lives on in Taimak’s ‘The Last Dragon’

The actor's memoir is a backtracking through a life under scrutiny and a life eventually left to chance.

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‘We Love You, Charlie Freeman’ Ponders Over Watching and Being Watched

This novel tries to find words for the ways in which being other means being constantly under observation.

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//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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