Articles tagged racism

16 Oct 2017 // 9:30 AM

NYFF 2017: ‘Mudbound’

Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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NYFF 2017: ‘The Rape of Recy Taylor’

This haunting documentary about a black woman assaulted by six white men in 1944 Alabama pivots deftly from crime story to history lesson without losing track of the human pain at its core.

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28 Sep 2017 // 9:30 AM

TIFF 2017: Woman Walks Ahead

This film confuses different types of oppression, and seems to propose that people who’ve experienced misogyny are uniquely qualified to understand racism and vice versa.

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26 Sep 2017 // 8:30 AM

TIFF 2017: High Fantasy

High Fantasy presents a brilliant take on the sci-fi body-switching genre, transforming a device that’s usually used for laughs into one that uncovers deeper truths about the complex nature of identity.

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Never Settle, Never Rest on Your Laurels: Activist Catherine Hernandez on Her Book, ‘Scarborough’

Theatre practitioner Catherine Hernandez reveals the complexity of representation and responsibility in writing fiction.

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On ‘Game of Thrones’ and Its Problematic Nod to John Ford Westerns

With Game of Thrones' massive cultural power comes responsibility. Alas, the John Ford homage "The Spoils of War" episode fails to address "savage Indian" stereotypes.

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Laughing Through the Pain With Kamau Bell

Why The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell is the book we need to get through these times we don’t want to be in.

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‘True South’ and the Foot Soldiers of the Civil Rights Movement

True South functions as a reminder of how great and important Eyes on the Prize is, and why it remains essential.

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30 Mar 2017 // 2:14 AM

Trevor Noah on the Biracial Divide

The indelible experiences of Trevor Noah's past have been parlayed into his memoir, Born a Crime, a history of a life living under racial divide.

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All Hail the King: Chuck Berry Reinvented Music, and America

After Chuck Berry, rock music would forever be a gumbo of competing and complimentary source points, but his first-person flights of fancy still represent its most undiluted potential.

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A Letter From Your Lesbian Friend to Your Black Friend

Some reflections on the challenge of educating allies, with the help of Ben Passmore's Your Black Friend.

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‘Get Out’ Is a Fantastic Freak-Out

Jordan Peele's new movie mixes humor, horror, and satire to create vital social commentary.

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Race Explored With Different Degrees of Emphasis: ‘Pioneers of African-American Cinema’

Encompassing documentaries, silent comedy, melodramas and religious films, this collection of early cinema made by American-American filmmakers is fascinating viewing.

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7 Feb 2017 // 4:00 AM

Chicago’s Chance

Chance the Rapper’s prideful ambition is reshaping Chicago’s cultural narrative.

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‘I Am Not Your Negro’, in Wide Release Today, Is Endlessly Relevant and Particularly Urgent

As this documentary presents James Baldwin's resistance, we might now take heart in it and also borrow from it.

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Colin Kaepernick and the Perils of Patriotism as Fandom

For citizens of a country founded on rebellion, many people in the United States seem inordinately resentful of someone speaking their mind.

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‘Hidden Figures’: Looking Beyond the Numbers

Hidden Figures assumes you'll share its vision, making correct judgments regarding differences between perception and blindness, bigotry and justice, right and wrong.

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Culture and History for the Age of Trump

History doesn’t always tell us how to get it right. It sometimes warns us of the cost of getting it wrong. Art steeped in that history can remind us, if we’re paying attention.

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If Studs Terkel Were Alive Today, What Would Steve Bannon Tell Him?

Terkel biographer Alen Wieder reminds us that if he were alive today, Studs would actually listen to the voices of the Trump voters -- all of them.

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Rage Plus Time Equals Prophecy: ‘I Am Not Your Negro’

James Baldwin’s requiem for three Civil Rights martyrs is also a letter addressed to future America and its “vast, unthinking, cruel white majority.”

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//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

READ the article