Articles tagged romance, drama, disease, medicine, dramedy, romantic comedy,

‘Song to Song’: Malick On Repeat

Terrence Malick retreads familiar motifs and themes in yet another nebulous navel-gazer.

READ more
‘Song to Song’ Revels in the Chaos of the Austin Music Scene

With layered character development to accompany his typically arresting visuals, auteur Terrence Malick may have finally found a palatable balance between his visual and narrative poeticism.

READ more
Spending the Night: Three Old Dark Houses Give Up Their Secrets

Chamber of Horrors, A Game of Death and Invisible Ghost bring '40s black and white thrillers to Blu-ray.

READ more

21 Mar 2017 // 9:30 AM

It’s Not Easy to Love Netflix’s ‘Love’

A hip, East L.A. backdrop, an indie soundtrack, fashionable faces -- yet Love is shockingly archaic in its depictions of heterosexual relationships.

READ more
‘Two O’Clock Courage’ Is Only a Quarter to Noir

This is a solid minor crime lark that tips its fedora to basic noir tropes.

READ more
‘The Good Fight’ Goes Meta in “Stoppable: Requiem for an Airdate”

The return on Elsbeth Tascioni marks the best The Good Fight episode yet, even if that means Maia might be getting played by her father.

READ more
We Destroyed New York Long Ago With ‘Deluge’

Here's a rediscovery for fans of old-school physical effects and early science fiction talkies.

READ more
‘Personal Shopper’ Dancing With the Camera

Maureen's (Kristen Stewart) ongoing dance with the camera seduces you, because it is, after all, a dance with you.

READ more
‘After the Storm’ Is a Moving Story About People Trapped Between the Past and the Future

Hirokazu Kore-eda’s latest domestic drama, this one about a spiraling writer and the family he’s disappointing, is tightly observed as always but slighter than usual.

READ more
‘Raw’ Feasts On Forbidden Flesh, Tastefully

Underneath all of Raw's blood and viscera is a carefully crafted weave of progressive and primal ideas that will keep you thinking long afterward.

READ more
‘Something for Everyone’ Is an Early, Albeit Sinister, Example of Queer Cinema

Directed by Broadway legend Harold Prince, this film's provocative subject matter made it one of MPAA's earliest X-rated movies.

READ more
Ken Russell’s ‘The Boy Friend’ Razzle-Dazzles ‘em

Russell loves the homely spit-and-bailing-wire reality as much as the polished eye-popping fantasy of theatre.

READ more
Swinging Two Hammers: ‘The Man Who Could Cheat Death’ and ‘The Skull’

Two British horrors with iconic stars about doctors who can't heal themselves and the women who love them.

READ more
‘Personal Shopper’, a Personal Ghost Story

Olivier Assayas' most recent production offers layered thematic content and a strong performance from Kristen Stewart.

READ more
The Asymmetry of Love in Fassbinder’s Fox and His Friends

Love always threatens to reduce one to the status of the mere thing, but Fassbinder finds hope precisely within this hopeless situation.

READ more
How Far Will an Incomplete Woman Go to Obtain Her Sense of Self?

Much in the way the women of Persona and 3 Women assimilate into lives of their objects of affection, the women of Single White Female experience a similar fatal mutualism.

READ more
‘Supernatural’ Alternates Between Humor and Dread in “Somewhere Between Heaven and Hell”

The show takes a lighthearted break before the potentially intense road to the finalé begins.

READ more
Violence Is the Vehicle, Not the Point, in ‘Headshot’

Headshot puts a few well-known action movies through something of a blender to come up with a strangely brilliant concoction.

READ more
‘On the Nature of Daylight’: Arrival’s Gentle, Beating Heart

Max Richter's 'On the Nature of Daylight' signaled that as a new parent, I was going to have a relationship with Arrival's message.

READ more
There’s an Impactful Tale Buried Within Emma Richler’s ‘Be My Wolff’

Richler’s details can be drearily extraneous and erudite, yet they also demonstrate how dedicated and well-researched she is in regards to her characters and the world in which they live.

READ more
More Recent Articles
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Tibet House's 30th Anniversary Benefit Concert Celebrated Philip Glass' 80th

// Notes from the Road

"Philip Glass, the artistic director of the Tibet House benefits, celebrated his 80th birthday at this year's annual benefit with performances from Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, Brittany Howard, Sufjan Stevens and more.

READ the article