Articles tagged satire

Cannes 2015: ‘Dheepan’ and ‘The Lobster’ Depict Different Kinds of War

Two movies screening in competition at Cannes, Dheepan and The Lobster, consider very different sorts of war, between hardcore gangs and between life aspirations.

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In 1987, ‘Hollywood Shuffle’ Satirized Hollywood’s Race Problem That Still Exists Today

Hollywood Shuffle sends up Hollywood's stereotype treatment of black actors.

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‘Maps to the Stars’ Brings Back Some Classic Cronenberg Horror

While not in the vein of Cronenberg's classic body horror thrillers, the bleak showbiz satire Maps to the Stars could well be a horror film after all.

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Weapons Drawn! Perspectives on Charlie Hebdo

Questioning cartoons, satire, and the role of the media after the Charlie Hebdo assassinations.

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Much Ado About Art, Satire and Terrorism

As the debate rages over Charlie Hebdo’s controversial cartoons, Art Spiegelman offers sage advice on cartoons and free speech.

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Tracing a Literary Lineage in Jonathan Franzen’s ‘The Kraus Project’

This unlikely combination of a translation and memoir offers as many telling insights into the preoccupations of Jonathan Franzen as it does into Karl Kraus' life and work.

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12 Feb 2015 // 10:57 AM

Has America Turned Into a Spoof of Itself?

Did postmodernism kill literary satire? I’ve been wondering about this in the wake of the terror attack on the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, known for its caricatures of the prophet Muhammad; one appears on the cover of the first issue after the attack, brandishing a placard that declares “Je suis Charlie” while shedding a tear.

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The Lesbian Sex Joke: Did You Get It?

Lesbians are willing to answer some of your questions, but their patience is wearing thin and it’s more enjoyable to mock the “ignorant shit” than to get angry about it.

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We Are Charlie Brown

In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo attacks, what I want more than anything is for art to be redemptive for any who view it, and for comics to be transformative.

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24 Oct 2014 // 1:30 AM

The Commandments of Lenny Bruce

Lenny Bruce made the stage his pulpit, the audience his parishioners, and stand-up the sermons for his alternative secular faith.

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The Sonny Rollins / ‘New Yorker’ Controversy and Jazz’s Image Problem

Why do jazz folks always sound so defensive about the music they love? Why can’t they take a pie in the face from Django Gold?

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Is ‘The Simpsons’ TV’s Most Sacred Show?

The Simpsons has always taken topical roads less traveled and nowhere is this more apparent than in its regular engagement of personal, institutional, and social issues surrounding religion.

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Poetic or Introspective Registers Carom Off R-Rated Vernacular in ‘The King of Good Intentions’

The King of Good Intentions depicts scenes that have not yet vanished, although most of its record stores have, on shady blocks off Melrose or Wilshire.

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BBC Radio: Tune in for a Grin

The BBC has recognised that its mission statement "to inform, educate and entertain" must, simply must, include radio comedy.

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‘Millennium People’: The Middle Class Catastrophe

J.G. Ballard’s helter-skelter novel of terrorism and bourgeois revolt is really an elegy for the fantasy of the comfortable and secured life.

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20 Jun 2011 // 9:00 PM

In Praise of Silliness

They say you gotta laugh to keep from crying. A simple dose of pure silliness taken on a regular basis is much needed, these days.

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‘Four Lions’ With a Ridiculous Roar

Chris Morris transcends the obstacles of the delicate subject matter of suicide bombers and creates a sharp satire.

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Let’s Play: Interactivity by Proxy in a Web 2.0 Culture (Part 3)

Today marks the third of four articles dedicated to fully unpacking my recent paper for Rutgers School of Communication, presented earlier this month at the

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‘Campus’ Series Premiere

The new series from the makers of Green Wing feels like comedy by the numbers.

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‘Shock Corridor’: The Enemy Within

Sam Fuller’s lurid 1963 potboiler about an egomaniacal journalist going undercover in an asylum strips bare the schizophrenia of postwar America with vicious hyperbole.

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More Recent Articles
//Mixed media
//Blogs

A Crooked and Unseen Highway: lowercase - "She Takes Me"

// Sound Affects

"The newest Between the Grooves series tackles Lowercase's Kill the Lights, a great marriage of slowcore and post-punk: raw, angry, sullen, and very much alive almost 20 years later.

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