Articles tagged sci-fi, tv, drama, comedy, stargate

‘The Teacher’ Shows That Communism’s Impact Still Resonates

Director Jan Hrebejk uses a Bratislavan high school to explore abuse of power and the effects of group complacency endemic to the time.

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Stephen King Adaptation ‘It’ Hurts

Director Andy Muschietti’s adaptation of Stephen King’s horror classic is a hodgepodge of tones and genres that begs the question, “Who is the audience for this movie?”

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Bond on Valium? This Game of ‘Hopscotch’ Is a Low-key but Entertaining Affair

A slow first act can't keep Walter Matthau from soaring as an opera-loving agent with no more license to kill.

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Ever Wish You Could Go into a Parallel World? Todd Tucker on ‘The Terror of Hallow’s Eve’

For those who have been bullied, revenge fantasy The Terror of Hallow's Eve may prove cathartic.

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‘Supergirl’: Season Two Offers a True Multigenerational Viewing Experience

Supergirl is super charismatic in super campy action; Warner Brothers brings the DC character to life for a new generation.

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‘Halt and Catch Fire’: Season 4 Deals With the Past While Moving Forward

For all the big events this show covers, Halt and Catch Fire never sacrifices nuance and thoughtfulness for twists or attempts to outdo itself.

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On ‘Game of Thrones’ and Its Problematic Nod to John Ford Westerns

With Game of Thrones' massive cultural power comes responsibility. Alas, the John Ford homage "The Spoils of War" episode fails to address "savage Indian" stereotypes.

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Cromulons and Headists: Finding Religion in ‘Rick and Morty’

Rick and Morty can't resist the tug of religion in its dark and expletive-filled sci-fi universe.

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‘Friends From College’ Is a Show About Identity That Fails to Establish Its Own

Netflix's new series stumbles with a season that's sometimes lovely but mostly messy.

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Time Travel Manga: What Would You Do If You Could Repeat the Past?

Time travel manga such as A Distant Neighborhood, Orange and Erased teach us a great deal about our shared humanity in these times.

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Sleazy ‘Good Time’ Takes You to the More Squalid Precincts of the Human Spirit

This riveting crime thriller from the Safdie Brothers is like the slimy friend that knows all the best dives.

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‘Blade II’ Pioneers the Marvel Sequel Yet Remains Hopelessly Outdated

If Blade reflected its time in 1998, Blade II, despite of-the-moment visual effects dazzling action, feels like a film from an earlier era.

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De Niro’s Rupert Pupkin Is Far More Menacing and Relevant Today Than His Travis Bickle

What is it about Martin Scorsese's The King of Comedy that made its menace too intense for audiences than other gangster dramas of the '80s?

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‘Hopscotch’ is Anchored in Walter Matthau’s Playful, Irascible Personality

With his novel, Hopscotch, Brian Garfield challenged himself to write a suspenseful spy tale in which nobody gets killed.

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How It Slips Away: ‘The Breaking Point’ Crosses Hemingway With Noir

Whether we've seen or read the story before, we ache for these sympathetic, floundering people presented to us gravely and without cynicism, even when cynical themselves.

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Chantal Akerman’s ‘Jeanne Dielman’ in Many Ways Strikes One As a Vermeer Painting Come to Life

This remarkable film shares many qualities with Vermeer’s paintings of domestic interiors in its obsession with frontality and its exquisite concern with the rich textures of Interior space.

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‘Logan Lucky’ Is an Oftentimes Funny Mishmash of Absurdism and Realism

Filled with colorful characters and playful plot twists, this hillbilly heist proves that Steven Soderbergh still loves a good con game.

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18 Aug 2017 // 2:00 AM

‘Narcos’ and the Trap of Tropicalism

How the Netflix original series Narcos “otherizes" Colombia and the Latin American through its single-story focus.

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It’s No Joke: Why We Need ‘Take My Wife’

As Seeso shuts down, this excellent series is in need of a new home.

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A Nice Guy in Noirland Reaches ‘The Breaking Point’

This 1950 adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's To Have and Have Not features John Garfield and director Michael Curtiz at their best.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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