Articles tagged sci-fi, tv, drama, comedy, stargate

‘The Star Trek Book’: This Is Why We Still Love Star Trek

Long before society caught up by heeding calls for diversity in education and the workplace, Star Trek was preaching "infinite diversity in infinite combinations" as a strength.

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Mr. Robot: Season 2, Episode 4 - “eps2.2_init1.asec”

Many of Mr. Robot's characters remain in a stalemate in an episode meant mostly to set up future battles.

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UnREAL: Season 2, Episode 8 - “Fugitive”

UnREAL continues to be compelling television for all the same reasons Everlasting is: it’s unafraid to create drama around deeply flawed characters.

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‘Bad Moms’ Embraces the Stereotypes It so Desperately Wants to Subvert

The story is uneven, the laughs are plentiful, but it's the politics that make this movie a tad... questionable.

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Just How Would Captain Fantastic Feel About His Own Film?

An average day at Ben Cash's commune -- at least in his mind -- would make Iron Man competitions look like intermediate intramural fluff.

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BrainDead: Season 1, Episode 5 - “Back to Work…”

BrainDead's response to switching days and losing ratings? The weakest episode yet.

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‘The Secret Life of Pets’ Indicates Filmwriters Are Worn Out

The Secret Life of Pets is what happens when filmmakers try to create a movie around an entertaining teaser -- you get a main course that makes you long for the appetizer.

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Roadies: Season 1, Episode 5 - “Friends and Family”

In an up-close and personal episode, the gang’s in Denver for a hometown double bill, and everyone's got an itch that needs scratching when it comes to family.

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Miles Davis’s Corporeal Score to Louis Malle’s ‘Elevator to the Gallows’

Davis's score doesn't articulate a narrative in this film; it provides a haunting, corporeal presence that refuses to assimilate to our efforts to find meaning.

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‘Doctor Who’ and the Constraints of the American Cultural Cold War

Decolonization, shifting demographics and the rise of the US needed to be understood and processed through the British popular imagination. The Doctor landed his TARDIS just in time to help.

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Preacher: Season 1, Episode 9 - “Finish the Song”

Worlds come crashing together in perhaps the best episode of the series thus far.

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Stranger Things: Season 1, Episode 1 - “The Vanishing of Will Byers”

Stranger Things captures fear and the '80s so brilliantly, you'd think Netflix injected it with some mad scientist-created serum to ensure maximum binge-worthiness.

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Mollner’s ‘Outlaws and Angels’ Trying Western Isn’t for the Weak of Heart

Mollner lays out this harsh story and rubs our faces in it. It's raw and hurtful and the sting remains even after the last frame has faded from our retinas.

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The A Word: Season 1, Episode 2

The best parts of The A Word are worth putting up with the awful parts, but why does writer Peter Bowker make his audience sit through them?

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The Summer of De Palma: Looking Back at a Master Filmmaker’s Career

Following the release of Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow's document on the eponymous director, the legacy of Brian de Palma's extensive and controversial filmography is given renewed attention.

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‘Kabali’ Is a Cerebral Gangster Film

Kabali, Rajinikanth's finest film in years, asks (and answers) whether the lumpenproletariat can be revolutionary.

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‘Café Society’ Is an Exhausting, Exasperating Film About Illusions and Delusions

The Woody Allen express rolls bumpily on with a glossy '30s-set bauble that half-heartedly poses the same interesting questions he’s been ruminating on for decades.

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Woody Allen Can’t Be Anyone But Himself in ‘Café Society’

Café Society is a competent film, but that's hardly praise for an auteur director like Woody Allen.

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Race and Sci-fi Theory: Not Just for Dissertations Anymore

Ever thought Toni Morrison's Beloved has a place at ComicCon? Carringont's Speculative Blackness might be for you.

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25 Jul 2016 // 2:15 AM

Double Take: ‘The Public Enemy’ (1931)

Maybe The Public Enemy is a swell dish. Or maybe it ain't so tough. The Steves take on the classic tale of beer and blood.

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Anticipation and Expectation in Game Marketing: The Art of “Anti-Hype”

// Moving Pixels

"Watch the trailer for No Man's Sky and then for Frostpunk. There is a clear difference in the kind of expectations each creates in its audience.

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