Articles tagged science

‘The Space Between the Stars’ Is a Stellar Debut

Combining meditations on faith and science with a ragtag band of dystopia survivors, The Space Between the Stars entertains and asks important questions.

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Alan Alda’s ‘If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?’

Alan Alda wonders, could scientists become more personable and available if they studied the art of improvisation?

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Trumpaholism, or, Is “Liquor Before Beer, Never Fear” a Piece of Fake News?

How I worry when I drink, and why Distilled Knowledge is diffuse knowledge.

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Alexander von Humboldt Carried the Spirit and the Genius of Goethe

Humboldt knew that nature, when properly channeled and understood, is something felt and experienced deeply and personally, that stimulates the imagination as well as the intellect.

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Nutty Professors? The Case for Scientist-Humorists in the Culture Wars

It's time for the personalities of the science community to emerge from their labs and to get into the ring.

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10 Oct 2016 // 2:00 AM

Nick Cave Predicts the End of Western Civilization

With “Higgs Boson Blues”, Cave simultaneously bemoans and embraces the existential crisis caused by hyperreality.

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‘Frankenstein’: An Indictment of Divine Indifference

By examining the perils of creation, Frankenstein is a parable of the inscrutable nature of man's relationship with God.

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The Biosemiotics of Butterflies: A Conversation With Victoria Alexander

It makes me miserable to see an artist turning himself into a handmaiden of science, using his skill to illustrate (or interpret) scientific concepts. C’mon man, I want to say, don’t make your art about science, use your art to do science.

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Where Is the Truth in Our Romance of Popular Physics?

If all the truth of physics is in the math, what kind of storytelling are we lay persons getting when we read popular accounts of physics that are completely stripped of it?

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The Empire of Scientism Strikes Back

Despite what Steven Pinker has claimed in his epic debate with Leon Wieseltier in The New Republic, science is less Theory of Everything and more Harper's "Findings".

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Life on Earth Has Suffered Five Known Mass Extinction Events. Has Mankind Triggered the Sixth?

Elizabeth Kolbert's warm, engaging clarity and use of anecdotes amid the data humanises her argument without softening the science of The Sixth Extinction.

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Is Humankind the New Planet and Species-Destroying Asteroid?

After fighting so long as a Cassandra of the coming ecological catastrophe, Elizabeth Kolbert's latest, The Sixth Extinction, embraces the long view of disaster.

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One Must Remember the Past in Order to Rectify the Future

Jeffrey Stepakoff's The Melody of Secrets is a complex story of unrequited love, racial tensions, the space age, and the after-effects of World War II.

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Our Animals, Ourselves: Jenny Diski’s ‘What I Don’t Know About Animals’

Don’t be fooled by the cover. Jenny Diski’s book isn’t really about animals; it’s about us.

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Sue Storm, the Fantastic Four’s Invisible Woman I always just assumed an invisibility cloak was something relegated to Marvel Comic’s The Hood, the

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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Racism and science collide in this devastating true story of a young woman, the tissue sample from her body that spawned a million-dollar industry, and the impact on her family.

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You Are Here by Christopher Potter

With a deft sense of narrative and gentle tenor, Potter leads readers through the quantum foam of quarks, gluons, and neutrinos, taming these wild particles for public consumption.

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25 Sep 2007 // 10:59 PM

Proust and the Squid by Maryanne Wolf

Because "the act of reading is not natural" in the sense of "genetically organized," the brain must "rearrange itself" to do so, a process Wolf explains on a neuronal level.

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18 Jun 2007 // 11:00 PM

Thomas Dybdahl: Science

Dybdahl attempts to win over the US with his gentle, subtle Norwegian pop

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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