Articles tagged thriller

Aaron Katz’s ‘Gemini’ Frames Him as a Storyteller with a Clear and Decisive Vision

While a deceptively simple film, beneath Gemini's visually polished skin lies a social awareness of the foibles of the media, and its consumption within contemporary culture.

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John le Carré‘s ‘A Legacy of Spies’ Has that Old Dark Magic

Le Carré’s first George Smiley novel since 1990 finds the spymaster’s old henchman forced to excavate the details of a long-buried mission they both wish they could forget.

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9 Oct 2017 // 2:30 AM

An Ozarker Considers Netflix’s ‘Ozark’

The local crime boss tells a lengthy parable about the difference between a hillbilly and a redneck; the upshot being that the hillbilly is craftier and more bound to a set of principles than a redneck.

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‘Mr. Robot’: Season 2 Widened the Narrative/Character Canvas Beyond Elliot’s Fractured Viewpoint

Disconnecting technology, connecting humans: as the world came apart, Mr. Robot's characters came together in promising new configurations.

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In Many Ways, ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Is Better Than Its Predecessor

A near-flawless audio-visual presentation and fascinating ideas make Blade Runner 2049 Villeneuve's best.

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‘Blade Runner 2049’ Is an Ambitious Vision of Startling Cinematic Beauty

Director Denis Villeneuve takes everything that was iconic about Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner and expands it into a sprawling examination of hope, destiny, and creation.

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The Western Genre Feels Like Home: Dutch ‘Brimstone’ Director Martin Koolhoven

"I can't deny the fact I am influenced by westerns... I was determined to do something that had not been done before."

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How the Sublime Absurdity in ‘Fargo’ Speaks to Our ‘Post-Truth’ Era

We are reminded that life is meant to be unsatisfying, so why should we expect anything more than the truth about reality from our TV programs?

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‘The Sinner’ Transcends the Procedural Genre With Complex Narrative and Performances

The Sinner, a sad, stunning exploration of trauma, starts with a killer hook and goes deep.

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8 Sep 2017 // 8:30 AM

The Flipside #6: Spectre

Spectre attempts to unify classic Bond camp with the grittiness of the Daniel Craig 007 films. Can anything be salvaged from the resulting mess?

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Do We Have to Explain Everything? Director Patricio Valladares on ‘Nightworld’

"...with my previous movie Downhill, that screened at FrightFest in 2016, a lot of people were bothered by the fact that I left things in the plot without explaining them."

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‘The Prowler’ Reveals the Horror of Getting What You Want

He carries the seeds of his own desperate, grasping, clammy doom...

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‘Annabelle: Creation’ Assaults the Senses From All Angles

David F. Sandberg takes a straightforward approach to horror in this atmospheric, immersive, The Conjuring spinoff.

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Through the Fog of TV Amnesia: Remembering The Briefly Lived ‘Coronet Blue’

Coronet Blue seems to be TV's earliest incarnation of the amnesiac hero, and moreover the amnesiac spy.

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‘Detour’ Director Christopher Smith Says He Hasn’t Even Started Making Horror Movies, Yet

"I think horror has become utterly boring... (E)verybody has got to pull their socks up a bit and start to dig a bit deeper," says Smith.

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‘Straw Dogs’ Searches for Human Nature but Finds Only Misogyny

The iconic value of Sam Peckinpah's filmic capture of human depravity doesn't outweigh its tired nihilism and especially its misogyny.

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Hanging Onto the Thin Skin of Space: Why ‘Dark Matter’ Matters

Dark Matter eschews the clichés of lazy sci-fi, so why isn't it more popular?

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‘Atomic Blonde’ Melts Down

David Leitch’s spy thriller is an unsuccessful blend of detached irony and detached retinas.

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With ‘Wish Upon’ You Come for the Horror and Stay for the Comedy

The clinical precision of John R. Leonetti’s simplistic horror premise is undermined by set pieces that resemble slapstick comedy routines.

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Truth ≠ Clarity: Antonioni’s ‘Blow-Up’ and the Melancholy of Discovery

Blow-Up taunts its viewers with a significance that never manifests, a Truth that always recedes.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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