Articles tagged war

Whom to Love and Whom to Hate in War and Film? Interview With ‘Land of Mine’ Director and Cast

"I have always been drawn to the flip side of the coin. My other two movies are also about the demons, the hate, and the betrayal," says Martin Zandvliet.

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The Proximity of the Spectral in Mizoguchi’s ‘Ugetsu’

Mizoguchi suggests that we are not so much haunted by ghosts as we project our own specters upon our reality.

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‘Sand + Bone’ Confronts What War Does to a Man

Sand + Bone doesn't take a position so much as it illustrates a problem.

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‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ Evolves Into an Emotional Powerhouse

Perhaps the greatest virtue of director Matt Reeves’ film is that it captures the madness of war without ever glamorizing the abhorrent carnage.

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War and the Novel of Integrity in ‘The Story of a Brief Marriage’

A brief, brutal, and exquisite novel set over the course of one day in a man's life in the refugee camps of war-torn northern Sri Lanka.

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Award-winning Cinematography Enriches François Ozon’s ‘Frantz’

Impressive camerawork draws viewers close to characters whose lives have been turned upside down by World War I.

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‘Megan Leavey’: The Story of a Dog and His Girl

Megan Leavey is not interested in the Iraq war as such. What it offers instead is the story of her journey, heartfelt and well-acted, but never surprising.

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Human Rights Watch Film Festival 2017: ‘Nowhere to Hide’

Zaradasht Ahmed's opening night film is a quiet but searing portrait of an Iraqi family hurled into exile by the chaos that followed the 2011 pullout of American forces.

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‘War Machine’ Takes a Satirical Look at the Lost Cause of the Afghanistan War

After a rough start and an unsure handle on what kind of comedy it wants to be, this Afghanistan war satire says what few have been willing to say.

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Power Play: Brian Williams, Leonard Cohen, and “First We Take Manhattan”

In "First We Take Manhattan", Leonard Cohen recognized the shared appeal of extremism in politics and art as the allure of power.

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Savage Revenge Film ‘Behind the Door’ Resonates in 21st Century America

This strange and troubling film suits America's current ruminations over social and political identity all too well.

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‘Anatahan’: A Bunch of Drones and “The Only Woman on Earth”

This film is a pure distillation of the lush, destructive jungle of desire.

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Do You Really Want to Know What’s ‘Behind the Door’?

The tales behind the camera are as sensational as those in front of it in this potent mix of beauty, propaganda and the macabre.

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Love Is (Sort of) in the Air in ‘Mystery Science Theater 3000 Volume XXXVIII’

Can poverty or flaming meteors stop the course of true love? Sometimes.

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‘Frantz’ Unfolds Elegantly Into a Haunting Meditation on Xenophobia and Acceptance

Franz Ozon again proves to be a most singular voice in world cinema with this deceptively haunting romance mystery.

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Still Living Dangerously After All These Years

As autocratic leaders slowly take over the First World, popular representations of a Third World coup take on renewed significance.

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‘Land of Mine’ Explores the Intolerable Costs of Nationalistic Vengeance

Land of Mine is perhaps the most powerful denunciation of nationalism's destructive force as we'll see on movie screens in 2017.

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‘Man Down’ Has the Dubious Distinction of Going Nowhere in Three Different Directions

Director Dito Montiel’s lack of subtlety cheapens a subject that calls for thoughtful examination.

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‘Hacksaw Ridge’ Is All Guts, No Glory

Mel Gibson’s directorial return is a celebration of violence and viscera that will leave you in serious need of a shower.

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Art, Journalism and War in Sarah Glidden’s ‘Rolling Blackouts’

Glidden's use of watercolors is beautifully rendered, creating a consistent visual language throughout that is a pleasure to look at.

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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