Moving Pixels

March 2014

Moving Pixels Podcast: ‘Brothers’, A Tale of Rubbing Your Belly, While Patting Your Head

Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons manages to create a unique and seemingly paradoxical game style, a single-player cooperative game in which your right hand has to cooperate with your left.


Illusions, Interactivity, and ‘The Wolf Among Us’

Part of what makes a great game great is how well it fosters its own illusion.


Moral Perspectives in ‘The Walking Dead’

Make no mistake, this is not a coming of age story. There is no moral truth to be had here, only complex, ever shifting moral perspectives to grapple with.


The Games of IndieCade: Part 3

I honestly believe there is something about IndieCade that leads one to think differently about games and that is quite a feat to accomplish given gaming's frequent commitment to conventionality.


Garret from ‘Thief’ is Either an Asshole or an Addict

At first, I thought Garret was just an asshole, but now I think he's just an addict. I’d like to help him, but all I can do is enable him.


Television HUD Creep

Perhaps it is the NFL that’s starting to look more like Madden?


The Games of IndieCade: Part 2

Does the museum environment persuade developers to display games that would feel out of place and alienated in another setting?


Competitive Depth and Exploitation in ‘Super Smash Bros. Melee’

Error and exploitation have made Super Smash Bros. a success.


Moving Pixels Podcast: Paths and Parables

This week we explore the branching narratives of The Stanley Parable to see if there can be a singular and straightforward way of understanding Stanley's plight.


February 2014

Can a Game Be So Bad It’s Good?

Since a game is interactive, it requires so much more effort on our part to progress through it that we can’t detach ourselves from the experience to enjoy it ironically.


January 2014

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September 2013

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Ubisoft Understands the Art of the Climb

// Moving Pixels

"Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed and Grow Home epitomize the art of the climb.

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