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by PopMatters Staff

31 Aug 2015


PopMatters (est. 1999) is a respected source for smart long-form reading on a wide range of topics in culture. PopMatters serves as a bridge between academia and popular culture. Thus, our articles are written in an engaging style that is both entertaining and erudite, yet free of stiff and cloistered academic language, and of course, far removed from the novice, the hype and the naiveté that crowds online media.

PopMatters articles appeal to cultural omnivores, historians, pop culture enthusiasts and intellectuals and geeks of many stripes. Our essayists approach their subjects with a strong respect for and knowledge of history—and with an eye toward where they think we may be heading next.

Feature essays are a minimum of 1,200 words, and there is no maximum limit, so long as the essay warrants the length. You may pitch a single essay, or a series of articles. We’d love to hear your ideas.

by Dawn Eyestone

27 Aug 2015

Which is better , Cher’s voice before or after Auto-Tune?

Deadline for essay pitches: Saturday September 11th

Deadline for final essay: Monday, September 28th

Submit your pitches to: PopMatters’ Features Editor Dawn Eyestone eyestone(at)popmatters.com

Email subject line: PopMatters / Auto-Tune

Auto-Tune, that now ubiquitous technology, got its less than humble beginning with Cher’s “Believe”.

Which is better, Cher’s voice before or after Auto-Tune?

But that’s just a rhetorical question, really.

by PopMatters Staff

20 Aug 2015


PopMatters is looking for smart music writers.

We’re looking for talented writers with deep genre knowledge of music and its present and past alongside a cultural generalist perspective with strong interests in many areas of culture.

 

MUSIC REVIEWS

Regular CD reviews run 500-700 words and display a knowledge of music history and real genre expertise, rather than simply “I like this” or “I hate that”. They should employ a smart look at the music within its larger cultural contexts. Capsule reviews run between 100-150 words.

by Dawn Eyestone

6 Aug 2015

Without Ray Harryhausen ’s monstrous inspirations, would so many films we love to fear have been as terrifying?

Deadline for essay pitches: Friday, September 11th
First drafts: Friday October 23rd
Final essay: Friday, November 13th
Submit your pitches to: PopMatters’ editor Dawn Eyestone eyestone@popmatters.com; cc: zarker@popmatters.com
Email subject line: Harryhausen SFX Legacy

Although filmmaker and special effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen officially retired from feature filmmaking in the ‘80s, his legacy continues on the set of B-movie films and Hollywood blockbusters alike. Even filmgoers who’ve never heard of Harryhausen are likely familiar with his film techniques and might recognize one or two of his creations. Without Harryhausen’s creatures in Clash of the Titans, film geeks everywhere would be without the battle cry “Release the Kraken!” Without Harryhausen’s development of stop-motion filming, how would George Lucas have made Luke Skywalker run across a frozen wasteland on the back of a fictitious Tauntaun? Without Harryhausen’s monstrous inspiration, would Spielberg’s Jaws have been as terrifying?

by Erin Giannini

5 Aug 2015

Will Saturday  Night Live ever die?

Pitch Deadline: Monday, August 31st
Final Essay Deadline: Monday, September 21st
Please send pitches to: giannini@popmatters.com, cc: zarker@popmatters.com
Email subject line: PopMatters / SNL – Still Alive

Like the late-night creature that it is, Saturday Night Live seems nearly unkillable. Started by Baby Boomers, reborn for a Gen X audience, and still watched by millennials, SNL has managed to stay, if not always relevant, at least on the air.

Seven presidents, two Iraq Wars, and numerous other sketch shows seeking the SNL crown have come and gone since George Carlin hosted the first episode in October 1975. What keeps a show—a comedy show, no less—around that long? The talent? The recurring characters, from Belushi’s Samurai to Cecily Strong’s “A One-Dimensional Female Character from a Male-Driven Comedy”? The commentary (and sometimes controversy) on the issues of the moment? Will SNL ever die? What is this constant human need that SNL feeds? (Or are we feeding it?)

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Country Fried Rock: Drivin' N' Cryin' to Be Inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame

// Sound Affects

""If Drivin' N' Cryin' sounded as good in the '80s as we do now, we could have been as big as Cinderella." -- Kevn Kinney

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