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by PopMatters Staff

28 Oct 2016


PopMatters (est. 1999) is a respected source for smart long-form reading on a wide range of topics in culture. PopMatters serves as a bridge between academia and popular culture. Thus, our articles are written in an engaging style that is both entertaining and erudite, yet free of stiff and cloistered academic language, and of course, far removed from the novice, the hype and the naiveté that crowds online media.

PopMatters articles appeal to cultural omnivores, historians, pop culture enthusiasts and intellectuals and geeks of many stripes. Our essayists approach their subjects with a strong respect for and knowledge of history—and with an eye toward where they think we may be heading next.

Feature essays are a minimum of 1,200 words, and there is no maximum limit, so long as the essay warrants the length. You may pitch a single essay, or a series of articles. We’d love to hear your ideas.

by PopMatters Staff

8 Sep 2016


From Primary Colors (1998)

The US presidential election of 2016 is scheduled for 8 November 2016, where the 45th President of the United States will likely be determined. Discussions and debates surrounding the event have been charged, to say the least. This is an excellent opportunity to cut through the hype and the rhetoric to explore the nature and depictions of elections, both within reality and in fiction.

To be a part of this historic conversation, PopMatters seeks submissions about elections in popular media, including but not limited to: presidential elections as they are represented in the media, political elections within film and television; high-school / sorority elections in media; film policy shifts, pledges, and promises; award voting controversies; the sci-fi and western genres and elections; nominated / randomly / unwittingly selected participants; and electoral commentary in videogames, cartoons, literature and other media.

by PopMatters Staff

25 Jul 2016


Deadline for Features pitches: 12 August 2016

Deadline for final, polished articles: 9 September 2016

When Star Trek debuted on NBC on September 8, 1966, there was little indication that its longevity across multiple platforms (films, series, books) would rival that of series such as Doctor Who, or that the series (and its fans) would become fixtures of popular culture, objects of academic study, and an outsized influence on science fiction.

by Dawn Eyestone

6 Aug 2015


Deadline for essay pitches: Friday, September 11th
First drafts: Friday October 23rd
Final essay: Friday, November 13th
Submit your pitches to: PopMatters’ editor Dawn Eyestone [email protected]; cc: [email protected]
Email subject line: Harryhausen SFX Legacy

Although filmmaker and special effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen officially retired from feature filmmaking in the ‘80s, his legacy continues on the set of B-movie films and Hollywood blockbusters alike. Even filmgoers who’ve never heard of Harryhausen are likely familiar with his film techniques and might recognize one or two of his creations. Without Harryhausen’s creatures in Clash of the Titans, film geeks everywhere would be without the battle cry “Release the Kraken!” Without Harryhausen’s development of stop-motion filming, how would George Lucas have made Luke Skywalker run across a frozen wasteland on the back of a fictitious Tauntaun? Without Harryhausen’s monstrous inspiration, would Spielberg’s Jaws have been as terrifying?

by PopMatters Staff

10 Mar 2015


Pitch Deadline: 4 April 2015
First Drafts: 20 May 2015
Final Essay Deadline: 15 June 2015
Contact: Erin Giannini and Karen Zarker
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Email subject line: Doctor Who: Contents & Contexts

Doctor Who holds the distinction of not only being the longest running sci-fi series, but also one of the longest running prime-time series, ever. While numerous scholarship (both academic and non) has examined both the original series (1963-1989) and the rebooted series (2005-present), we are seeking to examine the historical and cultural contexts of the series, including topics such as the “missing” episodes, the show’s place on the BBC, its global transmission, and branding of the series. (We will not be covering analyses of fandom or individual episodes.)

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Cube Escape' Is Free, Frustrating, and Weirdly Compelling

// Moving Pixels

"The Cube Escape games are awful puzzle games, but they're an addicting descent into madness.

READ the article