Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

8 Apr 2015


(If you are interested in pitching a review of some specific current work or performance, please contact the appropriate section editor.) We prefer careful analysis of the chosen subject matter with the intention of supporting an original thesis; we aren’t particularly interested in articles that merely want to promote their subject. An assessment of what ideological work a given pop culture phenomenon performs (i.e. what has allowed something to become popular, what’s at stake in its popularity besides money, how it is situated in a historical or geographical context, etc.) is especially welcome. Ideally essays will draw on sophisticated interpretive strategies derived from a theoretically informed point of view, but will be presented for a general reader in lively, accessible language.

For examples of the diversity of topics and range of approaches we welcome, please have a look at PopMatters features and columns archives.

by PopMatters Staff

15 Mar 2015


PopMatters is looking for talented music writers.

We’re looking for talented writers with deep genre knowledge of music and its present and past alongside a cultural generalist perspective with strong interests in many areas of culture.

 

MUSIC REVIEWS/FEATURES

Regular CD reviews run 500-700 words and display a knowledge of music history and real genre expertise, rather than simply “I like this” or “I hate that”. They should employ a smart look at the music within its larger cultural contexts. Capsule reviews run between 100-150 words and writers are expected to write both long reviews as well as capsules, and keep up with tight deadlines.

Feature pieces are in excess of 1,200 words and look at a particular artist, genre, trend or happening within the music world. They also look at the intersection between music and other cultural forms such as film, TV, multimedia, fashion, and politics. These pieces can include artist interviews and profiles of an exceeding smart and critical nature.

by PopMatters Staff

13 Feb 2014


With the intent of providing continued intelligent and entertaining content in the PopMatters’ Columns section, we are looking to broaden our staff of columnists and the voice of our writers’ community. We’re particularly interested in writers who live and work outside of the US, but that is not a deciding factor; in all cases, no matter the writer’s locale, we’re looking for those who can approach an array of cultural subject matter from their patch of the world with an international sensibility; that is, contextualize the local with an awareness of its place, historical and current, in the broader world.

Qualified writers are already readers of PopMatters (as but one vital supplement in their varied intellectual diet). They are familiar with the work of our current columnists, as well as other areas of the magazine, and they have a solid sense of what we’re looking for in content and caliber in these essays. We deliberately use the terms “essays” and “columns” interchangeably; as pieces are broad in scope yet grounded in real-world examples, and they are tied to regular deadlines and an established identity (and therein lay the “columnist” element). With these expectations in mind, we have monthly and every-other-month column slots available. Suitable writers are dedicated to regular deadlines and enjoy participating in friendly, ongoing communications with their editor.

by Karen Zarker

28 Jan 2014


Grunge audio speaker image from Shutterstock.com.

PopMatters seeks several essayists who are interested in writing regular, alternating essays on a range of topics in electronic music for the monthly electronic music column, The Difference Engine.

As a magazine of cultural criticism, PopMatters bridges academia and popular culture with smart, entertaining and well-researched writing. PopMatters columns are a minimum of 1,200 words and are broad in scope. We encourage the discussion of ideas over focusing on individual artists (we do a fine job of that in Interviews). See published installments of The Difference Engine here.

by Karen Zarker

23 May 2013


Ethan Hawke in Michael Almereyda's Hamlet (2000)

PopMatters seeks feature essays (min. 1,200 words - no max. limit) arguing the pros and cons of anachronism in film, literature, video games, music and other products of pop culture.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Hozier + Death Cab for Cutie + Rock Radio 104.5's Birthday Show (Photo Gallery)

// Notes from the Road

"Radio 104.5's birthday show featured great bands and might have been the unofficial start of summer festival season in the Northeast.

READ the article