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Friday, Aug 30, 2013
In a final season where the ultimate end-game is up for grabs, every character's motivations are up for dissection. Whether anyone can have the ending he seeks, however, remains the ultimate question.

When we left Walter and Hank at the end of “Blood Money”, the two men faced off in what ultimately was a draw. By the time we finish watching this pair of episodes, every other character has become drawn into the ultimate face-off, with everyone’s motivations up for careful critical dissection. What do these people want? What, to each, would be the appropriate ending for Breaking Bad? Over the course of “Buried” and “Confessions” every character gets the chance to showcase exactly what they feel would be the perfect result, and by the time we see Jesse pouring gasoline all over the Whites’ house, setting in motion the future we’ve only seen hints of, we know most of them – if not all – are about to be sorely disappointed.


This is, after all, Breaking Bad, a show which flaunts convention and all but demands an unhappy end for the bulk of its characters.


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Wednesday, Aug 28, 2013
Sometimes TV is so bad it's not even "bad" in a good way! And sometimes it's memorable for all the wrong reasons.

As my mother would be happy to tell you, as a kid and young adult I watched way too much TV. I’ve seen the good, the great and the guilty pleasures. And I’ve also seen the very, very bad. Some TV is so corny and so bad that you just kind of love it in spite of yourself and itself. The Brady Bunch Variety Hour falls into this category. And some TV is more bad by reputation than in actual experience; My Mother the Car is infamous for its very strange premise but, in actuality, wasn’t any more strange nor funny nor unfunny than many other shows on the air at that time.


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Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013
Total Divas is WWE's ode to its own misogyny, its glorification of its belief that women are peripheral to real narratives and that women don't deserve the same opportunities as men.

One of the only things tougher than explaining to people of unquestionable cultural taste (aka the creatively unambitious) that you’re a fan of professional wrestling is explaining that you’re a fan of women’s professional wrestling. Usually it’s possible to make a (simplified) case for the former – the spectacle, the physicality, the choreography, the history – that even the most rigidly dull defender of good taste can understand. Explaining an interest in the latter tends to be more problematic. Enjoying pro wrestling might be seen as an endearing quirk, but also being a fan of women’s pro wrestling, specifically, usually goes down as well as saying that you steal underwear from unattended clotheslines. The interest is invariably seen as – to use that wonderfully old-fashioned word – prurient.


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Tuesday, Aug 13, 2013
I've been saying it for years and tonight it held true: Introduce a DEA brother-in-law during season one and eventually you'll get a big boom. In "Blood Money", Dean Norris proves he's easily Bryan Cranston's acting equal.

SPOILER WARNING: This recap, as we’re sure you expect, contains spoilers if you haven’t seen the episode which aired Sunday. If you haven’t seen it, don’t read further—watch the episode and come back. No saying we didn’t warn you!


Give Vince Gilligan credit. Just as you think you’ve got his show and its characters figured out, that there’s nowhere they can go and still surprise you, he finds a few new ways to turn a screw and prove the rules of TV as we know it no longer apply. Forget waiting for multiple episodes of the final season to tick by before we get our confrontation between Walter and Hank. By the time we fade to black punches have been thrown, accusations made which cannot be taken back, and with cards laid upon the table there’s no turning back.


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Monday, Aug 5, 2013
The announcement, surprisingly, was not a left-turn that many were expecting. Some are raising hell over his place in the canon. You know what? It's going to be really, really hard to top Capaldi.

So now we know: Peter Capaldi is going to be in the TARDIS, cursing up a storm.


Or not (it is a family program afterall). Yet for a man who so elegantly delivered the phrase “fuckity-bye” as the deliriously profane Malcolm Tucker in In the Loop, Capaldi is a rather interesting, some would even argue bold choice to play the 12th Doctor.


Now, let it be known, there are people who are bemoaning two very specific points (already) about the announcement of Capaldi. For one, the producers could’ve been a lot bolder. Rumors have circles for years about there being a black Doctor. A female Doctor. Anything to offset the onslaught of increasingly-younger white men who always seem to be on the holding end of that sonic screwdriver. While there certainly is some legitimacy to that claim, Doctor Who is also going with a very strong “if it ain’t broke…” modus operandi here.


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