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Monday, Aug 5, 2013
The announcement, surprisingly, was not a left-turn that many were expecting. Some are raising hell over his place in the canon. You know what? It's going to be really, really hard to top Capaldi.

So now we know: Peter Capaldi is going to be in the TARDIS, cursing up a storm.


Or not (it is a family program afterall). Yet for a man who so elegantly delivered the phrase “fuckity-bye” as the deliriously profane Malcolm Tucker in In the Loop, Capaldi is a rather interesting, some would even argue bold choice to play the 12th Doctor.


Now, let it be known, there are people who are bemoaning two very specific points (already) about the announcement of Capaldi. For one, the producers could’ve been a lot bolder. Rumors have circles for years about there being a black Doctor. A female Doctor. Anything to offset the onslaught of increasingly-younger white men who always seem to be on the holding end of that sonic screwdriver. While there certainly is some legitimacy to that claim, Doctor Who is also going with a very strong “if it ain’t broke…” modus operandi here.


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Thursday, Aug 1, 2013
Amid the racist, homophobic and misogynistic hate speech on this season of Big Brother are some other ugly truths that also just won't go away

Bucking a growing academic trend, I am not one to see reality TV as a microcosm of American society. Mainly because, unlike reality TV, real life doesn’t come with hosts, commercial breaks, “physical challenges”, immunity idols and other reality show staples. But the current season of CBS’s Big Brother (and many of its prior seasons as well) has me re-thinking some of my stance.


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Thursday, Jul 18, 2013
Even while it mostly stands pat, Emmy’s surprise acknowledgment of Netflix original programming heralds mainstream success for a new broadcasting model.

It still remains to be seen whether 2013 will prove to be a true watershed in television history, like 1999/2000 (the debuts of The Sopranos and Survivor), but if this year’s Emmy nominations are any indication, then the future of TV is well upon us, and Netflix is leading the way.


Amidst the expected roll call of usual suspects in the drama categories you will find House of Cards, the political thriller shepherded by David Fincher and starring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright (both of whom received acting nominations). The significance, of course, is not that a prestige production is getting recognition, but who is producing it, and where (or, rather, how) it’s being broadcast. Netflix entrée into the TV game is now, as of this moment, a big deal—and the real deal. It’s not really a question of number of nominations (though the tally is respectable, nine for House of Cards, and a few more for the revival of Arrested Development) – it’s just the fact of being nominated at all. And neither is it a question of the other big TV numbers, ratings, since the Netflix model throws the outdated modes and metrics out the window (mostly by ignoring them, or at least being very cagey).


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Friday, Jul 12, 2013
by Elizabeth King
How long can Zoey Deschanel's quirk-laden loveability maintain its charm over audiences?

Zooey Deschanel is the beauty queen of quirk. There are those who find it “adorkable”, and those who have disdain for the New Girl star’s overabundance of peculiarity. It’s true that the dial on the Quirk Meter is bent to full capacity and – oh wait - the springs have popped loose. Just watch her in interviews speaking in lilting stops and starts, or in the films (500) Days of Summer, Almost Famous or Elf where the line blurs between Deschanel the person and her characters; they are one and the same. With her trademark fringe of dark brown bangs, and round, blameless eyes she executes the weirdness well. Her delivery is deadpan but without the element of surprise because with Deschanel we know what’s coming:  some declaration of what makes her atypical (Let me fill you in: it’s everything).


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Thursday, Jul 11, 2013
Despite many of the network’s and producer’s best—or worst—efforts, some critics and scads of viewers can't help admit how winning and emotionally functional this particularly notorious reality TV family actually comes across.

Now that the initial shock of TLC’s Here Comes Honey Boo Boo has largely subsided, we can take the time and reflect on this particular portion of popular culture and its surprisingly deeper ramifications.


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