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Sex scenes in film and TV have become truncated clichés. They begin with a kiss and end seconds later with the couple, post-coital, and strategically wrapped in sheets—he exposing his chest, her covered up almost to the neck. It is a particular type of scene that has been played out so many times and so many places that it’s hard to even start remembering where the last one happened. More importantly, however, these scenes don’t really depict the passion or intimacy of sex these two characters supposedly just engaged in.

Ken Burns’ The Address isn’t the greatest documentary ever made, but it’s an important one.

The film follows 50 boys from ages 11 to 17 as they struggle to memorize the Gettysburg Address for their peers at Greenwood School in Putney, Vermont. You’ve never heard of the boys, the school, or the small New England town in which they reside, but by the film’s end, you’ll be moved by their courage and perseverance.

The facts speak for themselves: in the ten years that an Emmy has been presented for a competitive reality series, CBS’s The Amazing Race has won eight times. (The only exception was in 2010 when the award went to Top Chef and this past year when it went to The Voice.

The way I see it, unless the producers of The Amazing Race decide to recuse themselves sometime soon (because their mantle is already full enough), I doubt, despite the two upsets, that any other reality show will be upending The Amazing Race‘s impressive domination of this category anytime in the near future.

The premature cancellation of great TV shows is, sadly, nothing new, as shows like My So-Called Life, Freaks and Geeks, and Firefly can attest. Yet it continues to happen, season after season. Low ratings, high concepts, and plain old bad timing are just a few reasons why some shows never get a chance to grow past one season.

Unfortunately, some shows seem destined for cancellation right away, regardless of critical acclaim or the support of small, fanatical groups of fans. Below are seven shows that not only were cancelled too soon, but may have also been overlooked as excellent one-season wonders.

Now well over ten years old as a major television genre (I chart as its origin the debut of Survivor on CBS in 2000), the fact that “reality TV” is now concentrating more and more on kids should not come as any great surprise. 

We have already had a decade of adults humiliating and demeaning themselves on reality TV for any number of things—for jobs, for love, for “glory”, even for food (Survivor, Big Brother).  So, after all that, where else was there to go?

The recent debut of the Esquire Channel’s controversial Friday Night Tykes and Lifetime’s unfortunately enduring Dance Moms series are answering the question above.

//Blogs

'Herald' Attempts the Troubled Waters of the Colonial Narrative

// Moving Pixels

"The “colonialism” at play is not between nations, rather it seems more interested in how it influences a man recently come of age.

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