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by Anthony Merino

19 Jul 2016


The A Word is a family drama centered around Joe Hughes (Max Vento), a five-year-old child with autism. The show opens with Joe’s uncle, Eddie Scott (Greg McHugh)—who’s coming home with his adulterous wife Dr. Nicola Daniels (Vinette Robinson) to live with his brother—trying to navigate a car with a small trailer up a driveway. The visual is a great, if unintended, metaphor for the episode as a whole. Writer Peter Bowker seems to be trying to combine a social realism drama with an absurdist farce. Director Peter Cattaneo’s lingering shots and documentary feel add to the weirdness of it all.

It’s an utter shame because the best parts of the show depict the family dealing with coming to terms with Joe’s condition. The other melodramatic stories at best distract and at worst undermine the believability of the family’s central crisis.

by Jessy Krupa

1 Jun 2016


Crowley: This is desperate, and stupid.
Dean: Well, desperate and stupid is pretty much all we got right now.

Carry on, wayward sons! It’s nice to see that no matter how much Supernatural changes throughout the years, one thing doesn’t, and that’s the spectacularly edited end-of-season montage set to the Kansas classic, “Carry on Wayward Son”. Perhaps this year, the song’s especially appropriate, considering that’s exactly what this week’s episode dealt with: carrying on.

by Jessy Krupa

24 May 2016


For a show on the lowliest broadcast network with next to no coverage in the mainstream entertainment press, Supernatural has attained its status of an epic cult hit because of its exceedingly memorable characters. Looking beyond the core cast of Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean (Jensen Ackles) Winchester, Castiel (Misha Collins), and Crowley (Mark Sheppard), the show built an universe full of lovable helpers (hunters, angels, prophets, etc.) and distinctive, occasionally likable villains (demons, monsters, gods, and witches). It’s an actor’s dream, where even guest stars that appear in a handful of episodes end up with their own fanbase and Funko Pop figurines.

by Jessy Krupa

17 May 2016


“We’re not asking you to believe that this is true, just act like you do. People do it all the time.”
—Dean Winchester (Jensen Ackles) to Donatello Redfield (Keith Szarabajka)

That quote pretty much sums up this week’s episode of Supernatural, as the show’s fans have been separated into two distinct groups since last week’s possibly series-changing reveal that Chuck (Rob Benedict) is God. Some fans loved the twist, believing that casting the most supreme being in the universe as a relatable human dork is clever and in keeping with Supernatural‘s overall aesthetic. Others think that God should be more God-like, played by someone with a more serious, commanding presence.

by Jessy Krupa

9 May 2016


In Supernatural fandom, there are several widely-held theories that fans believe and discuss, and either love or hate. Does the series have to end with Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean’s (Jensen Ackles) deaths? Is Ben (Nicholas Elia) Dean’s son? Is “Destial” actually a thing? Is Chuck (Rob Benedict) God?

Well, one of those questions was answered in this week’s episode, as Chuck Shurley, formerly known as a “hack writer”/unknowing prophet, revealed Himself to Metatron (Curtis Anderson), one of the series’ most unlikable angels.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Exposition Dumps Don't Need Dialogue in 'Virginia'

// Moving Pixels

"Virginia manages to have an exposition dump without wordy exposition.

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