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by Grant Rindner

20 Sep 2016


The third episode of Atlanta further capitalizes on one of the series’ primary strengths; its methodical pace and lived-in atmosphere make the show feel comfortable in its own skin. A typical high-concept series would still be zeroed in on propelling its central plot forwards; if Atlanta was on Fox instead of FX, this episode would be focused on cementing the budding musical partnerships between Earnest “Earn” Marks (Donald Glover) and his rapper cousin Alfred “Paper Boi” Miles (Bryan Tyree Henry), with Earn booking him a show or getting him more radio plays.

Instead, “Go For Broke” continues to establish the importance of the show’s central premise in a more cerebral and natural manner, without skimping on the surreal absurdity. Money (or lack thereof) is the overarching theme here, with Earn taking Vanessa (Zazie Beetz) for a dinner he stands no chance of affording, while Paper Boi and Darius (Keith Stanfield) find themselves tangled in a tense drug deal.

by Sean Fennell

20 Jul 2016


It’s amazing but in just a few short months Preacher has already carved a nice little groove for itself in an overly congested television landscape. It did so by refusing to do all the things that television fans often demand—most notably an easily understood plot—and did so with an almost mocking bravado. It has been an opening season that’s been at its best when it throwing things at the wall to see if they stick, which they have with almost otherworldly consistency.

We all knew this had to come to end. That showrunners Evan Goldberg, Sam Rami, and Seth Rogen had to eventually reign in all the stray parts of the series and build toward something substantial and concrete. Maybe I knew, but it hasn’t helped the fact that the last couple episodes, which feature a show creating boundaries instead of blasting through them, have been just the least bit disappointing.

by Anthony Merino

19 Jul 2016


The A Word is a family drama centered around Joe Hughes (Max Vento), a five-year-old child with autism. The show opens with Joe’s uncle, Eddie Scott (Greg McHugh)—who’s coming home with his adulterous wife Dr. Nicola Daniels (Vinette Robinson) to live with his brother—trying to navigate a car with a small trailer up a driveway. The visual is a great, if unintended, metaphor for the episode as a whole. Writer Peter Bowker seems to be trying to combine a social realism drama with an absurdist farce. Director Peter Cattaneo’s lingering shots and documentary feel add to the weirdness of it all.

It’s an utter shame because the best parts of the show depict the family dealing with coming to terms with Joe’s condition. The other melodramatic stories at best distract and at worst undermine the believability of the family’s central crisis.

by Jessy Krupa

1 Jun 2016


Crowley: This is desperate, and stupid.
Dean: Well, desperate and stupid is pretty much all we got right now.

Carry on, wayward sons! It’s nice to see that no matter how much Supernatural changes throughout the years, one thing doesn’t, and that’s the spectacularly edited end-of-season montage set to the Kansas classic, “Carry on Wayward Son”. Perhaps this year, the song’s especially appropriate, considering that’s exactly what this week’s episode dealt with: carrying on.

by Jessy Krupa

24 May 2016


For a show on the lowliest broadcast network with next to no coverage in the mainstream entertainment press, Supernatural has attained its status of an epic cult hit because of its exceedingly memorable characters. Looking beyond the core cast of Sam (Jared Padalecki) and Dean (Jensen Ackles) Winchester, Castiel (Misha Collins), and Crowley (Mark Sheppard), the show built an universe full of lovable helpers (hunters, angels, prophets, etc.) and distinctive, occasionally likable villains (demons, monsters, gods, and witches). It’s an actor’s dream, where even guest stars that appear in a handful of episodes end up with their own fanbase and Funko Pop figurines.

//Mixed media
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20 Questions: Rachael Yamagata

// Sound Affects

"After a four year break since her last album, Rachael Yamagata reveals a love of spreadsheets, a love for Streisand, and why it's totally OK to suck at playing guitar.

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