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by Jessy Krupa

14 Dec 2016


The "Lucifer-in-Chief" Jefferson Rooney (David Chisum)

“Lucifer’s not content with slutting it from one random vessel to the next. He’s moving on to blue chips, celebrities, captains of industry. He just got a lot more dangerous.” - Crowley

This week’s episode of Supernatural started out promising, with the creepy visual of Lucifer possessing an Archbishop (Mark Brandon), complete with red, glowing eyes and crucifixes turning upside down as he walks past them. But, after slaughtering a church full of priests trying to exorcise him, he moves on to a more predictable vessel: the President of the United States.

It’s a little refreshing that the show didn’t try to make any big political statement by making their POTUS a caricature of any current political figure. President Jefferson Rooney (David Chisum) is described as a deeply religious widower who’s in a secret relationship with one of his staffers, but his political party or views are never mentioned.

by Jessy Krupa

5 Dec 2016


Vince/Lucifer (Rick Springfield) talks about his abandonment issues.

“Lucifer was bad enough when he had a plan, a motive. Now he’s just having fun.”
Sam Winchester

When we last saw Lucifer (Rick Springfield), his body was rapidly decaying as Rowena (Ruth Connell) banished him to “the bottom of the bloody ocean”. So you might be wondering just how he could be the center of this week’s episode? As it turns out, all it takes is a devil-worshiping teen (Jeff Evans Todd) and a “Lucifer feather” purchased off of the Internet. Lucifer instantly appears in the teen’s basement, and snaps the necks of his devotees before revealing that these feathers have the power to heal him, but only for a little while

by Jessy Krupa

22 Nov 2016


Billie (Lisa Barry) offers to take Mary back to heaven.

“Was that why you spent the entire ride up here telling me in extreme, excruciating detail how you killed Hitler, but you neglected to mention the fact that your mom is back from the dead?”
—Jody Mills

Tonight’s episode of Supernatural featured two characters from the show’s past and a few new additions that we might see again in the future, but the plot was wrapped up so speedily that the whole thing just seemed like a missed opportunity. All in all, it continued season 12’s pattern of great character development and an interesting season-wide arc, but with half-baked, quickly resolved weekly plots.

by Jessy Krupa

14 Nov 2016

A resurrected Hitler is thrilled by
the possibilities of Twitter to gather new followers.

Supernatural has an illustrious history of weekly monsters, but this week’s episode dealt with an especially unusual villain: Adolf Hitler. It leads to the question of whether or not imagining an actual person—particularly one who caused as much death and damage as Hitler—as a horror fantasy is or isn’t in bad taste. Despite the gore and violence that usually comes with horror movies and shows, there’s a certain lightness that comes with the adult realization that imaginary creatures such as vampires, ghosts, werewolves, zombies, and the like don’t actually exist.

Horror movies about Hitler and Nazis, however, aren’t unusual (ranging from the laughably ridiculous They Saved Hitler’s Brain to more recent fare like Dead Snow), and many horror characters are loosely based on actual, often tragic events (such as how Dracula was inspired by the bloody war exploits and reign of Vlad the Impaler, or how the bacteria-related death of an archaeologist led to the idea of The Mummy‘s ancient Egyptian curses.) Regardless, given Supernatural‘s history of mashing up pop culture, ancient myths, religious lore, and just plain ridiculousness, no one should really be shocked by “The One You’ve Been Waiting For”.

by Jessy Krupa

8 Nov 2016


Gail Peterson (Christina Carlisi) channels Margaret White in the latest episode.

This week’s episode of Supernatural is the last one to air before Election Day, and as random as that may seem, it might be easy to see some political symbolism in the plot. The major point of “American Nightmare”, not to mention season twelve in general (so far), however, seems to be dedicated to exploring the concept of family.

At the beginning of the episode, Dean (Jensen Ackles) texts Mary (Samantha Smith), asking if she was okay and whether or not he should still call her “Mom”. He gets an answer at the end of the episode, when she writes that she hadn’t seen her messages because she needed to buy a cell phone charger and, most importantly, that she’ll always be both his and Sam’s mother. Isn’t it a little odd, though, that she didn’t actually call, just because, in typical mom fashion, she could then hear their voices? It seems a little suspicious to me, considering that there are British Men of Letters bent on kidnapping and torture, and possibly Lucifer himself, still on the loose?

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