Latest Blog Posts

by Devin Mainville

5 Nov 2010

Over the years, America has “borrowed” many television ideas from the Brits. The UK has have given the US hits like The Office and Dancing With the Stars and some that got lost in translation, like Coupling. Unfortunately, I believe the latest import will fall into the latter category.

For a show that centers around youths coming of age in South England, Skins has developed a cult following stateside, a cult following that is none too happy about the news MTV is reworking the show to create an American version of Skins.

by Joseph Fisher

2 Nov 2010

Since roughly the midpoint of its first season, Glee has been a train wreck. Which means that despite the show’s endless onslaught of WTF moments—like when Rachel and her estranged mother bond, love glue gunning all over the place, during a bizarre take on Lady Gaga’s “Poker Face”—I have not been able to tear my eyes from it.

For a while, I’ve been trying to pinpoint exactly why the derailment happened. Mostly, my concerns have been about Glee’s slow transformation from a smart send-up of the High School Musical films (and teen dramas more generally) into a heavy-handed, humorless public service announcement. I held off on passing judgment on that transformation because the show did, once upon a time, seem innovative in its attempts to explore topics like physical disability, queerness, and interracial teen relationships. Excepting the wheelchair stunt double kerfuffle, Glee’s writers exposed those issues with equal amounts of satire and sincerity.

by Abel Trevino

27 Oct 2010

In the United States, it’s only fitting that the premiere of The Walking Dead, a television series based off the comic book by Robert Kirkman and Tony Moore, will occur on Halloween. If the name doesn’t say it already, it’s about zombies.

I’m just going to get to the point, the pilot was a pretty bad ass setup for a TV series. However, it was a little slow and if the series doesn’t blend the perfect combination of pace, character development and post-apocalyptic fright and gore, it’s not going to draw the mainstream audience and it will lose the target audience. Although, AMC has already placed an order for the first season, which will be composed of six episodes, and there are rumors that, before the show has even premiered, discussions for a 16-episode second season are underway. AMC is putting a lot of faith in this and, quite frankly, they have a good reason.

by Melissa Crawley

21 Oct 2010

A limo ride in The Real Housewives of D.C

At the end of a recent episode of The Event, the mysterious leader of an otherworldly group of visitors tells the American president that her people have been waiting “66 years” and their patience is running out. On the other hand, I’ve only been waiting a few hours to find out what the ‘event’ is and my patience ran out around episode two.

The Event is part Lost and part FlashForward. The group of mystery people alludes to Heroes, but without the charm of a villainous Sylar and the conspiracy aspect places it in the category of 24 but without the fierceness of a Jack Bauer. I might have more patience for this identity crisis if it wasn’t for the show’s reliance on back story flashbacks.

by Melissa Crawley

20 Oct 2010

It might be dangerous for ratings to divide the first season of a serialized drama in half but if Caprica’s part-two season opener, Unvanquished, is anything to go by, it’s even more dangerous to combine virtual technology and religious fundamentalism. While part one established the series’ conflict between science and faith, part two complicates the fight by exploring the far more frightening idea of what happens when technology and faith start to work together.

We rejoin the action with Soldiers of the One (STO) member Sister Clarice (Polly Walker) who designs an explosive plan to bring the masses “apotheosis” through a virtual heaven filled with avatars of the One God martyrs. Her plan to bolster the faith through an artificial afterlife finds a counterpart in Daniel Graystone’s (Eric Stoltz) equally disturbing scheme to conquer grief by creating digital avatars of the deceased with whom the living can interact. Graystone however, cannot implement his plan alone and his Faustian deal with the Tauron criminal underworld suggests that his troubles are only beginning.

//Mixed media

Oz Is Not Down Under As Everyone Thinks It Is

// Re:Print

"Frank L. Baum's Oz isn't in the land of Aussies, as one might think, but in a far more magical setting.

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