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by Michael Landweber

8 Oct 2010


I’m a huge fan of serialized shows, particularly the supernatural otherworldly type. Give me a bizarre mystery, confused characters and a hint of a conspiracy and I’ll tune in. Unlike most intelligent TV viewers, once I start watching, I almost never stop until the bitter end. 

Unfortunately, the ending for serialized shows is usually bitter these days. Almost none of them stay on the air long enough to reach a satisfying conclusion. 

I’m not talking about the rare shows that end with some degree of purposeful ambiguity, such as Lost. I loved the final episodes on the island (and the purgatory of sideways-ville) because they answered enough of my questions, but more importantly they completed the creators’ vision of the show.

by Lynnette Porter

7 Oct 2010


Glee characters Simpson-ized (L/R) Finn Hudson, Mercedes Jones, Rachel Berry

Pop culture icon-wannabes know they’ve truly made it when they guest on The Simpsons, and many of the best Simpsons episodes revolve around musicians and singers. Over the years almost every music genre has been well represented by a Who’s Who from international entertainment: Sting, Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Tony Bennett, Barry White, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Bette Midler. Johnny Cash, U2, Dolly Parton, Elton John, Britney Spears, Kid Rock, The Who, Mick Jagger, Tom Petty, Green Day, Dixie Chicks, Plácido Domingo, Ludacris, and 50 Cent, among others. In this episode, broadcast Sunday, 26 September, Flight of the Conchords and Glee provide the soundtrack to Lisa’s life.

The Simpsons has become more than entertainment; it confers elite pop culture status to those included in the series’ documentation of the important people, trends, and touchstones of our times. In years to come, cultural anthropologists could learn much about turn-of-the-21st-century America from the evolving litany of Simpson cultural references and themes. While quintessentially American, The Simpsons reflects a globalism well beyond the grasp of its Springfield-centric characters (with, of course, the exception of exceptional Lisa).

by Kit MacFarlane

6 Oct 2010


According to recent news reports, Katy Perry’s recent duet with Elmo for Sesame Street won’t be aired thanks to complaints about Perry’s low-cut top (although it’s still available on YouTube—see below).

Unfortunately, all debates about breasts ever seem to do is draw attention away from the real points of concern.

Perry’s outfit is no big deal. More concerning is the typical warped viewpoint that sees a little cleavage as a huge problem, while the actual content of Perry’s mind-numbing ideologically stilted nonsense (referred to as ‘music’ by her marketing company) draws no attention whatsoever. Defenders of Perry’s outfit are no better, responding with either a hip shrug or sexual-liberation self-righteousness, but similarly turning a blind eye to the fact that this immensely disturbing ideologue does her real damage in more insidious ways.

by Jessy Krupa

5 Oct 2010


Before the premiere episode debuted, the network pushed a massive publicity campaign, which included heavy advertising and special preview opportunities. This summer, select subscribers of Entertainment Weekly magazine in which DVDs of the pilot were sent along with branded merchandise in order to get positive word-of-mouth going for the series.

Despite all that, Lone Star’s first two episodes only averaged at about four million viewers, thus leading FOX to replace the show with new episodes of Lie To Me. (Human Target will then be moved to Wednesday nights.)

A network spokesman confirmed that no more episodes will be filmed, but there are four more unseen episodes left. It’s likely that these episodes will be shown during either the mid-season (around December or January) or next summer, if at all.

Lone Star was the first cancellation of the Fall 2010 season. In what also seems like bad news for FOX, their ratings powerhouse House has seen a significant drop in viewers and another one of their new series, Running Wilde, is another candidate for cancellation.

by Melissa Crawley

1 Oct 2010


In the opening sequence of the first episode of Nikita, Maggie Q is wearing a slinky bathing suit while fighting bad guys. Really? She’s so thin that I’m pretty sure they could just blow on her and run away. In the second episode, she’s wearing more clothes but they mostly consist of skintight leggings. This only seems to emphasize that her legs are about the same size as her arms.

Despite my feelings that Maggie should gain a few pounds, this is not a piece where I want to argue about Hollywood standards of beauty. For all I know, she has a hearty appetite and an enviable metabolism. I also don’t want to debate body image as presented in the media and its effect on women. If a woman is watching Nikita and searching for a role model, she should take note that an actor of Asian descent is the lead on an American TV series. What I do want to briefly examine is the issue of physicality and its relationship to the credibility of a character and their story.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Seeing through the Perspective of '_Prism'

// Moving Pixels

"The best puzzle games teach us that there's always more to learn, and _Prism succeeds in this regard through its final lesson. There’s more than one way to interpret a pattern.

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