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by Anthony Merino

25 Jun 2015


Director Justin Lin fixates on roads, highways and interstates throughout the first two chapters of the second season of True Detective. He uses them as ligaments to connect the series together, splicing a few seconds of roadways between shifts in story lines. Yet the only street name he shows to the viewer is for Mulholland Drive, an Easter egg reference to David Lynch’s classic 2001 movie Mulholland Dr., which itself was originally intended to be a TV series.

There are several parallels between True Detective and Mulholland Dr. Both the series and the movie overlay images in silhouettes and use ghostly images of the main characters in their opening credits. The second episode of True Detective‘s second season, “Night Finds You”, opens with Vince Vaughn’s Frank Semyon recounting a childhood drama, and concludes with another nod to Mulholland Dr. Semyon considers that he could have died there, and that his current life is a dream, “something’s telling me to wake up, like I’m not real, I’m only dreaming.” Later on, there is a scene where the three different interests—the city, county and state—discuss the creation of a task force. This scene is staged very similarly to a scene in Mulholland Dr. At this point, there is no way to tell if there are going to be some additional linkages to the movie, or if it was just Lin injecting thought candy for film geeks.

by Sean McCarthy

3 Oct 2013


Just to state the obvious - this article contains spoilers about the final episode of Breaking Bad.

Creator Vince Gilligan said the finalé of Breaking Bad would be polarizing. But at around 9PM CST, I swear I could hear a spontaneous cry of elation as Jesse wrapped his shackles around the throat of his baby-faced, dead-eyed, child-killing captor Todd and squeezed the life out of him. It was the payoff the vast majority of fans wanted, especially since it was at the hands of a character you hoped would walk away from the inevitable carnage of the final episode.

by Jonathan Sanders

30 Aug 2013


When we left Walter and Hank at the end of “Blood Money”, the two men faced off in what ultimately was a draw. By the time we finish watching this pair of episodes, every other character has become drawn into the ultimate face-off, with everyone’s motivations up for careful critical dissection. What do these people want? What, to each, would be the appropriate ending for Breaking Bad? Over the course of “Buried” and “Confessions” every character gets the chance to showcase exactly what they feel would be the perfect result, and by the time we see Jesse pouring gasoline all over the Whites’ house, setting in motion the future we’ve only seen hints of, we know most of them – if not all – are about to be sorely disappointed.

This is, after all, Breaking Bad, a show which flaunts convention and all but demands an unhappy end for the bulk of its characters.

by Robert D. Schultz

29 May 2013


It has taken a few days, but I have now entered into the acceptance phase of my grief over the fourth season of Arrested Development. There is so much wrong with the new straight-to-Netflix 15 episodes that it’s hard to remember how this seemed like such a good idea only a week ago (and for years prior). In the run up to the all-at-once release of the episodes on May 26 at 3.00am EST, there was much debate about how to watch the episodes. Should viewers watch them in order, out of order, all at once, one a time with some breaks in the middle, etc.? I presently find myself asking a different question: should these episodes even be viewed them at all? The existential question as to whether this season should have ever been attempted is important, but first let’s gets to why the new season is such a disaster.

For one, the feel of the show is completely different from its former self. Jason Bateman’s Michael Bluth was always the lead in the first three seasons and for good reason. He was the dependable good guy who, despite his justified inclination to leave his selfish family behind, always subverted his own happiness for the good of the comically self-absorbed people he felt obligated to protect. Michael tied the bizarre strands of the show together and provided the audience a reliable source through which to experience the funny, but awful things that the people he loved did to each other and to him.

by Dorothy Burk

15 Feb 2013


TNT’s Southland kicked off its fifth season on Wednesday night with the carefully crafted, intense drama that has made the show a favorite among its diehard fans and critics of crime television alike. The show picks up with the storyline several months after season four ended, offering us an intimate look at how policing changes our society—and the police. This episode’s opening voice montage was particularly haunting: We hold cops to a higher standard because we give ‘em a gun and a badge. The only trouble with that is, they’re recruited from the human race.

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'True Detective': Maybe Tomorrow

// Channel Surfing

"True Detective, Season 2, Episode 3: Where does the kitsch end and the surreal begin?

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