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Thursday, Oct 3, 2013
"Ozymandias" may be Breaking Bad's crowing achievement, but "Felina" gave audiences what they wanted, and it's mercifully devoid of pandering.

Just to state the obvious - this article contains spoilers about the final episode of Breaking Bad.


Creator Vince Gilligan said the finalé of Breaking Bad would be polarizing. But at around 9PM CST, I swear I could hear a spontaneous cry of elation as Jesse wrapped his shackles around the throat of his baby-faced, dead-eyed, child-killing captor Todd and squeezed the life out of him. It was the payoff the vast majority of fans wanted, especially since it was at the hands of a character you hoped would walk away from the inevitable carnage of the final episode.


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Friday, Aug 30, 2013
In a final season where the ultimate end-game is up for grabs, every character's motivations are up for dissection. Whether anyone can have the ending he seeks, however, remains the ultimate question.

When we left Walter and Hank at the end of “Blood Money”, the two men faced off in what ultimately was a draw. By the time we finish watching this pair of episodes, every other character has become drawn into the ultimate face-off, with everyone’s motivations up for careful critical dissection. What do these people want? What, to each, would be the appropriate ending for Breaking Bad? Over the course of “Buried” and “Confessions” every character gets the chance to showcase exactly what they feel would be the perfect result, and by the time we see Jesse pouring gasoline all over the Whites’ house, setting in motion the future we’ve only seen hints of, we know most of them – if not all – are about to be sorely disappointed.


This is, after all, Breaking Bad, a show which flaunts convention and all but demands an unhappy end for the bulk of its characters.


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Wednesday, May 29, 2013
by Robert D. Schultz
What was always subversive and exciting about Arrested Development was its ability to be so offbeat, so irreverent, and so clever within the confines of a 22-minute block of network TV.

It has taken a few days, but I have now entered into the acceptance phase of my grief over the fourth season of Arrested Development. There is so much wrong with the new straight-to-Netflix 15 episodes that it’s hard to remember how this seemed like such a good idea only a week ago (and for years prior). In the run up to the all-at-once release of the episodes on May 26 at 3.00am EST, there was much debate about how to watch the episodes. Should viewers watch them in order, out of order, all at once, one a time with some breaks in the middle, etc.? I presently find myself asking a different question: should these episodes even be viewed them at all? The existential question as to whether this season should have ever been attempted is important, but first let’s gets to why the new season is such a disaster.


For one, the feel of the show is completely different from its former self. Jason Bateman’s Michael Bluth was always the lead in the first three seasons and for good reason. He was the dependable good guy who, despite his justified inclination to leave his selfish family behind, always subverted his own happiness for the good of the comically self-absorbed people he felt obligated to protect. Michael tied the bizarre strands of the show together and provided the audience a reliable source through which to experience the funny, but awful things that the people he loved did to each other and to him.


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Friday, Feb 15, 2013
Southland returns for a fifth season with more of the drama, tension and heartbreak that viewers have come to expect from the show.

TNT’s Southland kicked off its fifth season on Wednesday night with the carefully crafted, intense drama that has made the show a favorite among its diehard fans and critics of crime television alike. The show picks up with the storyline several months after season four ended, offering us an intimate look at how policing changes our society—and the police. This episode’s opening voice montage was particularly haunting: We hold cops to a higher standard because we give ‘em a gun and a badge. The only trouble with that is, they’re recruited from the human race.


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Monday, Jan 28, 2013
Serious business occurs in this week’s episode, and it doesn’t involve marginal progress in one of the lame stories, or a footman spilling something at dinner. No, this is about as good as the show gets, and it really is predicated on shocking you.

Wow. Well, just wow. Serious business occurs in this week’s episode, and it doesn’t involve marginal progress in one of the lame stories, or a footman spilling something at dinner. No, this is about as good as the show gets, and it really is predicated on shocking you.


Here goes. In this episode, Sybil delivers her baby against the backdrop of some doctorly disagreement, before, hours later, succumbing to eclampsia and, incredibly, dying. I must say that I found this development profoundly surprising, mostly because she seems like such an odd character to kill off and because I had no prior notion that it was going to happen. While I fear that much from this third series has been spoiled by anyone who ever reads things about TV on the internet (which, by definition, includes you), I can attest to the fact that, for an unspoiled viewer, this was a shocking and momentous episode. Honestly, this is all so dark that, like a character in Glee spontaneously breaking into song, I feel compelled to break into a list. You know, to lighten the mood a little.


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