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by Jessy Krupa

21 Apr 2017


Dean and Sam interview the local stoner

“Next time you hear me say that our family is messed up, remind me that we could be psycho goat people”.—Dean Winchester, “The Memory Remains”

One of my favorite episodes of Supernatural is season one’s “Scarecrow”, in which the Winchesters discover that an entire small town conspires to offer up unsuspecting visitors as a sacrifice to an orchard-blessing pagan god. The episode stands as a good example of an excellent stand-alone episode, not only because of the interesting twist on the sometime-hypocrisy of “good, old-fashioned small-town values”, but also because of the uniqueness of its monster-of-the-week: an eerily tall, reaper-like creature masquerading as a Gothic scarecrow. Not to mention that it featured one of Dean’s (Jensen Ackles) best lines, “I hope your apple pie is freakin’ worth it!”

It may just be me, but this week’s episode seemed to have a lot in common with that season one classic. “The Memory Remains” was also set in a small town, and concerned the mysterious disappearances of various visitors and townspeople over a long period of time. Like “Scarecrow”, the culprit ended up being a pagan god who promised wealth and economic success to those who supported his taste for blood. Not to mention, Dean mostly played the same role: he befriended a local girl, enjoyed the food, and supplied the comic relief. However, one could easily argue that all horror movies and TV shows are comprised of old ideas, just as “Scarecrow” shared some similarities with the Jeepers Creepers series of movies. Still, there were enough differences in this episode to set it apart.

In “The Memory Remains”, the pagan god seemed to take the form of a man with a goat’s head. The locals have heard about this legendary “Black Bill”, but mostly believe him to be an ominous myth parents told their children to keep them out of the woods. After a local stoner (Daniel Doheny) reports that he saw his missing best friend (Antonio Maryiale) ripped apart by this beast, the Winchesters are sent in to investigate.

Want to see the difference between seasons one and 12? Back in season one, Dean just shared some awkward chemistry with a local girl. This time, it’s deliberately implied that he spent the night with a waitress (Aliesha Pearson) whose name is only mentioned once. While Dean still loves the local food (even after visiting a bloodied meat-butchering plant), he’s now grown overconfident in his ability to destroy a pagan god, thanks to the Colt in his coat.

In season one, there was no doubt as to the identity of the main villains; they were the first couple whom the Winchesters’ met in town. This time, we wondered if the creature’s helper was the town’s seemingly lax sheriff (Steve Boyle), before we discovered that it was actually his class-envying half-brother (Ryan McDonald), who was previously introduced in the episode in another role.

In what has become a common complaint among Dean fans, however, it was actually Sam (Jared Padalecki) who saved the day by shooting the monster(s) while his brother was incapacitated. (In “Scarecrow”, Sam also saves the day by untying his brother from a tree.) All in all, “The Memory Remains” is one of season twelve’s better stand-alone episodes, but it still doesn’t hold a candle to “Scarecrow”.

In other news, Mr. Ketch had been texting the Winchesters in Mick Davies’ name, before telling them the events of last week’s episode made the organization request his presence in London. What’s more, he says that he’ll be working with them from now on, before adding, “I’d much rather be working with your mother”, a line that has resonances beyond the brother’s knowledge.

While Sam and Dean were in Wisconsin, Ketch and his minions searched, photographed, and cataloged everything in the Winchesters’ bunker, including Dean’s dirty magazines and cassette tape collection. (Life isn’t so glamorous for every member of the British Men of Letters, I guess.) He orders them to plant (horribly oversized) listening devices throughout the place, but is compelled to steal a childhood photo of Dean with his mother. Is it because he’s suspicious of the fact that she hasn’t aged in more than 20 years, because he’s obsessively in love with her, or a little bit of both?

Dean also has left multiple voice-mails for Castiel (Misha Collins), but hasn’t received any response. Shouldn’t the Winchesters already know by now that when someone they know doesn’t answer their phone, it’s time to organize a rescue mission? Regardless, we’ll have to wait until the next episode to see what Cass has been up to, for in the next episode, he returns to help the Winchesters in their fight against Dagon (Ali Ahn).

by Jessy Krupa

3 Apr 2017


“Have you, like, never seen a horror movie? Two kids, dark road, creepy noise in the woods? We keep walking- and boom!”
—Hayden (Abby Ross) in “Ladies Drink Free”

This week’s episode of The CW’s Supernatural began in the same way that countless horror movies (and episodes of this show) have, with two teenagers taking a late night shortcut home through the darkened forest. One is a spoiled teenage girl, caught sneaking into a bar and texting with an unseen boyfriend, the other is her concerned brother (Jordan Burtchett), who ends up getting attacked and killed by a snarling, mask-wearing man. What would have been more surprising if it wasn’t for the episode’s title is that this strange creature only bites the girl before running away.

Naturally, the Winchesters visit her at the hospital in order to ask questions, but this time, they have a special guest.

by Jessy Krupa

28 Feb 2017

Playing with fire: Crowley (Mark Sheppard) gets schooled by
his mother Rowena (Ruth Connell).

Dean: So where does that leave us?
Mary: Same as always. Family.
—“Family Feud”

Many Supernatural devotees will tell you that the show isn’t just about “saving people, hunting things”, but rather the power of family. From the first episode onward, the show has introduced and explored many different kinds of familial bonds, from the unconditional love between the two Winchester brothers to the deeply dysfunctional relationship between God (Rob Benedict) and the ultimate prodigal son, Lucifer.

by Jessy Krupa

15 Feb 2017


Dean's (Jensen Ackles) mechanical bull prowess is one of the many things he forgets.

“I don’t know. We kinda sound like heroes to me… And our best friend is an angel—Whaaat?!”
—Dean in Regarding Dean

A common complaint among Supernatural’s fans is that the show’s actors don’t get the recognition that they deserve. After all, shouldn’t actors who can effortlessly go from action scenes to comedy, then handle serious drama, and believably deal with this show’s often ridiculous plotlines, be celebrated somewhere other than the Teen Choice Awards? One could say that the show is ignored because of mass competition or media bias against its network, but one could also argue that, in recent years, Supernatural hasn’t given its actors enough material to really show off their talent.

by Jessy Krupa

3 Feb 2017


Alicia Witt plays Lily Sunder in Supernatural

“Patience is a talent. You’d be amazed what a person can do with a little bit of purpose and an abundance of time.”
—Lily (Alicia Witt) in Lily Sunder Has Some Regrets

It’s safe to say that about half of Supernatural‘s fans weren’t looking forward to this episode. Many viewers, for one reason or another, dislike Castiel (Misha Collins) and don’t particularly care for angel-based storylines, believing that they take too much screentime away from the Winchester brothers and their mission of “saving people, hunting things”.

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